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Slope Records head honcho announces debut single from his new band The Blankz


Left to right Nikki Blank, Johnny Blank, Tommy Blank, Andy Blank, Jaime Blank.

Slope Records topman Thomas Lopez announced today that his Phoenix-based record label would be releasing his new band’s debut 7-inch single on July, 13 as well as a series of 9 more singles that will be worked into one compilation at the end 2018. “White Baby” is The Blankz premier single with a b-side of “Sissy Glue,” and will be available in CD, vinyl, cassette, and digital download.

The band consists of Lopez, aka Tommy Blank on vocals, Jaime Blank on guitar, Nikki Blank (The Darts) on synthesizer, Andy Blank on bass and Johnny Blank on drums.

“Jaime and I agreed from the start that we want this to be a fun band with snotty lyrics. There are passing mentions of drugs and partying (though I am 13 years sober) and a few non-P..C. lyrics, but The Blankz have no interest in political rants or agendas,” says Tommy Blank (Lopez).

The Meat Puppets own Cris Kirkwood is acting as producer on the first two 7-inch vinyls, and for their first installment, they are touching a personal chord for Lopez. “White Baby” is literally about him and his life being adopted by Mexican parents in 1969. The tune is delivered with a contagious synth-based punk rhythm with plenty of elements of New Wave mixed in proudly harkening back to the group’s influences like The Ramones, Devo, and The Spits.

 

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Stza Crack Returns from Mexico for his First Hometown Show in 8 Months


All Photos by Jeff Schaer-Moses Photgraphy.
Scott Sturgeon of the Crack Rock Steady 7 at The El Cortez in Bushwick

If punk is dead than somebody forgot to tell Scenic Presents and the rest of the New York City punk scene. Because things got live as fuck in the Safari Room at El Cortez in Bushwick, Brooklyn on Sunday evening when Scott Sturgeon’s auxiliary band The Crack Rock Steady 7 swung through for a hoedown.

The room was packed to the gills from start to finish to see Rebelmatic, Skullcaster, Trashy, and late edition (literally added to the bill during the show) Cop/Out get down with the godfather of the Crack Rock Steady beat. But even though Stza was the main attraction the riotous punks in attendance made every band feel welcome by singing along to the lyrics and moshing along to the rhythms.

Left to right Alkatrraz, Creature, and Karnage of Rebelmatic.

Rebelmatic was first up and their drummer Ray Reed is an absolute punisher behind the kit. His ferociousness on the drums sets the entire tone for his bandmates lead singer Creature, guitarist Alkatraz, and bass player Karnage who all come together to drive home some of the most original punk music in The Big Apple.

Skullcaster is fast and heavy just like front man Joey Steele’s other project All Torn Up,

Upstarts Skullcaster, a band that Stza himself claims to have helped name, got up second next and their brand of hardcore punk got the crowd going really good. A little too good in fact and frontman Joey Steele had to banish some crowd destroying bros to the back of the room mid-set. The group shares two members with All Torn Upin Steele, and guitarist Jay Tancer (also of The Crack Rock Steady 7) so they come with a built-in fan base in the City That Never Sleeps and they delivered for their devotees.

Katie Hoos of Cop/Out is an organizer of New York City’s Punk Island along with their bandmates.

Third up was Cop/Out, sort of an all-star team of the New York City politico/punks all of whom help organize Punk Island, an event which they called “the biggest free DIY punk music festival in New York City.” The group didn’t know they were going to be playing until just before the set and the group shares Steele with his other projects as lead singer. He admitted he may have left a little too much on stage opening with Skullcaster but still managed to dial in a more than competent performance that came off as much more tongue in cheek than his other projects.

TransCore darlings Trashy took the slot right before CS7 and even with a singer/guitarist Al working double duty in Cop/Out they put on a tremendous set. To start the set off the group invited anyone was queer, short, or brown to the front of the stage to catch the show.

Santos, bass, and Jayne, drums of Trashy.

They have a much more melodic/poppy sound than the two bands that came before and deliver them in a much more upbeat way than Skullcaster and Cop/Out. Don’t get me wrong, the doom and gloom of anti-capitalism is important … but it’s okay to smile every once in a while too. Some of Trashy’s subject matter may be pretty heavy, but they still deliver it in a fun and relatable way.

Scott Sturgeon and his Crack Rock Steady 7 were really more of a Crack Rock Steady three and a half in the Safari Room on Sunday. Sturg was joined by Tancer on bass and a drummer as well as Enoch on guitar on some songs. Before getting into the set Sturgeon let the crowd know this was his first New York City show in 8-months, which is the longest he had gone without a hometown throwdown in quite some time.

Scott Sturgeon, left, and Jay Tancer headlining as The Crack Rock Steady 7.

The group opened with two Choking Victims tunes and then moved in to “3,000 Miles” by the Star fucking Hipsters before “Fucked Reality,” and “Zombie Christ,” which lead into renditions of “500 Channels” and “Crack Rock Steady.” Stza also unveiled a brand new tune known only as “Metal Banger” for now, which he claims could be the first tune on Leftover Crack’s next record.

Things got pretty choppy when Stza and Tancer switched instruments to go into what they were referring to as:”the extended cut” of “Ya Can’t Go Home.” The bass gave out on Stza multiple times before he decided to take the strap off and throw a mic to the ground and head off stage. Sturgeon’s tantrum lasted about 10-minutes but he did return to the stage once the tech was working again. As a Kanye fan, I was way into the idea of one of my favorite artists leaving the stage a refusing to come back due to tech issues, especially so many songs in. But heaving Stza re-enter and finish out strong wasn’t a bad way to go either.

Crowd surfers abound all night at The El Cortez.

After the intermission it was a few more songs including “Money Change,” and “Born To Die,” and The Crack Rock Steady 7 closing out strong. Frankly, it was a lot like watching a rehearsal, but when it’s Crack Daddy Caine himself playing the tunes and a familiar New York punk audience that ain’t so bad.

Add The Crack Rock Steady Siete to My Radar   Add to My Radar



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Hot Snakes – Jericho Sirens


Band: Hot Snakes
Album: Jericho Sirens
Label: Sub Pop
Release date: March 2018
Sounds like: Forgetting your insulin, AGAIN. A hatchet job. Mystery Boys. 

Everyone, Hot Snakes are back, and not just in pog form! I cannot tell you how much I’ve missed this sound. With Obits, frontman Rik Froberg retained some of that tense, scattergun guitar noise, but without his partner in musical crime, aka John “Speedo” Reis, it just wasn’t the same. Couple their six strings together and you get something that apparently owes lots to The Wipers – add in Gar Wood on bass, Jason Kourkounis and Mario Rubalcaba on drums and you’ve something truly incredible.

Whilst Jericho Sirens is typically a Hot Snakes record, time has obviously honed this well-oiled machine, (14 years to be precise) and you’ve something that takes elements from all their past records – the ripping chaos of Automatic Midnight, the experimental darkness of Suicide Invoice and the meaty crunch of Audit In Progress. So, it’s the perfect Hot Snakes record, right? I’m not saying that, but neither am I saying it isn’t. With Speedo’s Rocket From The Crypt touring, releasing mysterious 7″ records, and his and Froberg’s Drive Like Jehu teasing us with sporadic shows, having Hot Snakes back is mouth-watering to say the least.

Jericho Sirens is a bludgeoning, dangerous and deadly beast of a record and the 14 years have been well worth the wait – you need this in your ears right now…

Jericho Sirens opens with the shrieking, stocky guitars of I Need A Doctor, which sounds eerily like If Credits What Matters I’ll Take Credit from their debut, but at a slower speed, but with more seething bile, courtesy of the pipes of Froberg. Time hasn’t weathered those vocal chords one bit – it’s still that same scrappy, raw, hacking sound, especially the way he roars the song’s title “I need a doctor/Tell me what I’m gonna do? I need a doctor/One you can direct me to?” As an opener, it scorches the land with this shredding, wailing caterwaul of the twin Swami-guitars not to mention the howling synth lines echoing in the background. The pace then takes an erratic jolt on the chopped up stagger that is Candid Cameras; percussion is disjointed, irregular and overtly complex, giving nods to the lurching post-punk of the aforementioned Drive Like Jehu which should please fans of the math-rock titans.

Hot Snakes don’t want you to feel any sort of comfort or relaxation though – oh no. Despite them perfecting this particular sound, you would think “okay, I know what’s coming” but you really have no idea – it’s the way they manipulate and attack their sound that sets it apart. Take the 78 second burst of noise that is Why Don’t It Sink In? – it’s pure thrash-trash punk fury, urgent, breathless, sweaty and destructive. It seethes with teeth-gnashing urgency and spitting venom and seems to be in a race to reach the sudden exhaustive conclusion as it smashes into the wall and owes a lot to the speed that made their debut, Automatic Midnight, so vital and vibrant.

The surf-rock vibes on the radiant Six Wave Hold-Down perfectly encapsulates the cover of Jericho Sirens (Gar Wood catching a rip curl, right?) and brings to mind the snarling, tense punk of their work on Audit In Progress, whilst the summer-punk rock of Death Camp Fantasy, has the brilliant call and response from Froberg in the form of: “Have I, been preyed upon? EVERYBODY!” queue the rest of the band screaming the words back at him. There’s your fucking crowd favourite right there.

There’s many of them on this, but the standout track has to be the weighty heft of the title track. As the harmonica creeps in (hello I Hate The Kids) as do those lurching, staggering riffs that don’t let up during this 4 minute barrage of dark, menacing, but upbeat fortitude. Chances are you will have Froberg’s words of “Jericho Sirens, I hear…” firmly ear-wormed into you head by the track’s raucous and punishing conclusion. Easily one of the best songs they’ve ever recorded – up there with Salton City and 10th Planet for sheer heaviness and crunching power.

The ripping chug of the incandescent Psychoactive bristles with hair-raising power-chords and those trademark churning, rolling, finger-bleeding riffs – meaning you’ll be grinning from ear to ear on this one, especially every time Froberg yells the words “I WANT SUCCESS!” – cracking. Jericho Sirens closes with the rambunctious salvo of Death of a Sportsman, a bouncing, scrappy punk number that gives huge nods to Let It Come in structure, with Gar Wood’s booming bass thundering the track forward, backed by the solid drumming power of Kourkounis and Rubalcaba. It’s the sinister guitar lines that haunt this in the background though – coupled with the return of the squealing harmonica and the foreboding suzzy-punk rock drive.

Hot Snakes redefined punk for me when I first discovered them in 2004, and remain an important, volatile and deadly combination of razor sharp guitar lines, sardonic lyrical couplets and brutally fast rhythmic punches to the face, gut, hell the entire body. Jericho Sirens is a bludgeoning, dangerous and deadly beast of a record and the 14 years have been well worth the wait – you need this in your ears right now.

You can purchase Jericho Sirens from Sub Pop or stream via bandcamp below.

 

Top tracks: I Need A Doctor, Six Wave Hold-Down, Jericho Sirens, Death Camp Fantasy, Psychoactive, Death of a Sportsman

Links

Hot Snakes
Hot Snakes Bandcamp
Sub Pop

Lizard Hips

Lizard Hips

Junior Vice President of Keep It Fast. In other news: I work in social media, talk about dinosaurs, run a book club and have amazing facial hair. I am also a male man who is still not dead.

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KRIMEWATCH – Self-Titled LP [Review]



Artist: KRIMEWATCH

Title: Κrimewatch

Release: LP / Digital

Year: 2018

Label: Lockin’ Out Records

New York City’s KRIMEWATCH are part of the new wave of excellent young bands taking the punk scene by the storm. If, somehow, this is your first encounter with the band and their notorious logo, I’ll recommend you paying close attention to this one.

To find an outstanding DIY punk-rock band in a sea of d-beat, crust and metal is like searching for a needle in the haystack. Because of this, NYC’s Krimewatch has gained a well-deserved attention over the last couple of years, and I’m really excited that they’ve finally managed to release a proper, though twelve-minutes long, album. The LP includes all the thrills from both previous releases. Present here are the instant favorites “Machismo” and “New York Nightmare” from their promo flexi on Boss Tuneage, while “小便 たれ.” and “Coward” were all rage and fury on their highly acclaimed demo. In addition to the new kick given to these four songs, there are also five brand-new bangers that follow the same path; short, catchy and distorted punk-rock with shouted female vocals and driving beats with a knack on Japanese punk and the pinnacles of New York Hardcore sound.

The singer Rhylli knows how to deliver shouty vocals, while spitting lyrics in both her native Japanese and English, in a way that sounds interesting and eventually sticks into your head. Emma’s active bass lines build up a relentless punk-rock rhythm, while the breakdowns and guitar riffs will not be the same without the influence of heyday NYHC classics such as Krakdown (also an influence on Krimewatch’s name), Leeway, Warzone, or Agnostic Front. The cover artwork is also a stand out—the omnipresent Krimewatch dark silhouette (a subversion of the Neighborhood Watch symbol) overseeing over a graffiti-like drawn representation of upstate New York. The Japanese lyrics and influences are also in no way contradicting to the overall theme but rather add to the whole picture of NYC as a multicultural melting pot that spawned a generation of angry youth of all creed and color, and to this day subcultures and music scenes continue to be their strongest means of expression. At the same time, the great community vibe is threatened by personal conflicts and striking social issues like poverty, sexism, racism, police violence, or a gentrification of the hood. So here comes the shady Krimewatch figure on patrol, more like a street justice hero to protect your friends and neighbours from the violent gangs of the state, police, and businessmen.



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Neuroot – Obuy and Die! [Review]



Artist: Neuroot

Title: Obuy and Die!

Release: Vinyl / Digital 

Year: 2018

Label: Civilisation Records

Neuroot is an early 80’s Dutch punk band that lived the street fight and helped to shape the raw & aggressive sound of this golden era. Active between 1981 and 1987, they’ve recorded a several great records that became classics in the Netherlands.

In 2013, original bass player Marcel reformed the band and the seminal records “Macht kaputt wass euch kaputt macht” (demo tape, 1983) and the “Right is Might” EP (1986) were reissued on vinyl by different labels. That was great news for anyone looking for a tight, pissed-off and roughly produced 80’s hardcore punk from the flag-bearers of the anarcho scene in the Netherlands.

Imagine my surprise when I’ve got the new LP from Neuroot in my mailbox. It turned out that the guys went to the studio to record a brand new album that they have released in 2018. The LP is called “Obuy and Die!” and in short it sounds nowhere near their stuff from the 80’s! They still have the political lyrics and the punk attitude within themselves, but the sound has become much slower and more melodic. All the raw, crude hardcore sound that was a staple in the 80’s is gone. That isn’t necessary a bad thing since the time flies and you’ll probably fail miserably if you try to recreate the same thing in 2018. On the other hand, making a new record that’s stripped down of all its rawness and energy is also a big disappointment. I tried to like “Obuy and Die!” but it’s just a forgettable punk-rock record that may have moments that sound like a dad rock. I guess, the only thing I liked about it is the lyrics. Okay… don’t get me wrong, it’s also a honest effort that deserves a great appreciation.

If you haven’t heard about Neuroot before, please don’t listen to their new record. “Macht Kaputt…” is what I would totally recommend to you. Only then you can get “Obuy and Die!” on vinyl, more like out of respect for the band and their still awesome punk attitude.





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Le Butcherettes sign to Rise Records, share new “spider/WAVES” video


It’s been almost three years since Le Butcherettes put out their last album, A Raw Youth. That may change soon, however, as they have just signed on with Rise Records. Additionally, the Mexican garage punk band has dropped a new single.

Titled “spider/WAVES”, it’s a cut that’s both fiercely assertive and ominous, with lead singer Teri Gender Bender’s vocals leading the way. “Lyrically, it’s like this big delicious spider has its wave,” she noted of the track in a press statement. “In a way, we’re all caught in it. This thing wants to devour as much as it can, but you have to make sure you’re okay. You’re trying to protect yourself from something that wants to get in.”

The single was produced by Talking Heads member Jerry Harrison, who’s previously worked with Violent Femmes and No Doubt. It comes packaged with a Noun-directed music video as well, in which Teri Gender Bender can be seen wearing a Chichimeccan warrior outfit in honor of her grandmother.

Check it out below.

“spider/WAVES” Single Artwork:


unnamed 4 Le Butcherettes share intense new single spider/WAVES and video: Stream
Next month, Le Butcherettes are scheduled to tour parts of the US alongside Hot Snakes.

Le Butcherettes 2018 Tour Dates:
05/09 – Orange County, CA @ The Observatory
05/10 – Phoenix, AZ @ Crescent Ballroom
05/11 – San Diego, CA @ The Observatory North Park
05/12 – Los Angeles, CA @ The Ritz
05/15 – San Francisco, CA @ August Hall
05/16 – Portland, OR @ Wonder Ballroom
05/18 – Dener, CO @ Oriental Theater



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Manual De Combate – Deus Ex Machina [EP Review]



Artist: Manual De Combate

Title: Deus Ex Machina

Release: Digital / Cassette

Year: 2018

Label: Self released

One of the most interesting and ambitious bands of the new wave of punk in Santiago, Chile—always striving to survive—is Manual De Combate. They have been consistently playing shows and releasing splits and EPs, and their most recent one, Deus Ex Machina, it’s one of their most interesting approaches to their sound, with only one track that reaches the 16 minutes mark. Wanna know more about this experimental punk duo? Keep reading a bit.

Their most recent effort make them sound almost as fierce, raw and primal as they sound live, with a droning bass that interchanging melodies and rhythms fastly and consistently along the drums that make this duo so vibrant and energetic. This is probably their best effort yet.

As always, the lyrics are politically charged, talking about concepts as important as memory and the history of people’s fights against oppression, as well as the need to create an alternative to the way we live our lives daily, and how we relate to society, along with samples that talk us about the same issues.

Making this record using almost only drums and bass makes it hard and interesting in the same time, as it is a punk record that doesn’t conform to punk standards. That’s what the band is always striving for, it seems. The tape version is made in Argentina by Percha and has the EP on the A side and the songs from the split with the band from Valparaiso, Dumo, on the B side.

This one was mixed and mastered by Milo Goberoff at Estudios Hukot with the art and design made by Kráfica. It is really a delightful record. But that’s for you to decide, for sure. Check it out!



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An Interview with Justin Pearson


As a musical genre, punk’s not commonly considered to be riddled with nuance, suggestion, or surprise. What you see is what you get. It’s either on or it’s off. Loud or louder. Rude, bombastic, brutal, or all of the above. Like it or go the fuck home. But every now and then, someone or something comes along, to challenge all you thought you knew about anything ever. Enter Mr. Justin Pearson.

By the impressionable age of twelve, Justin had infiltrated Phoenix, Arizona’s hardscrabble punk rock scene. Going to shows like Suicidal Tendencies and Fugazi, Justin’s moral, social, and political points of view began taking shape. A code of ethics formed around the chaos of his internal and external worlds; and it wasn’t long before this shitty, pissed-off kid figured out that punk is far more than just some fleeting rebellious veneer. It’s a way of life, requiring absolute independence while maintaining respect for yourself and your environment.

Over the past 20 years, Justin Pearson has become one of hardcore’s most formidable figures. Owner of Three One G Records; bassist for bands like Dead Cross, The Locust, and Head Wound City; Retox and Planet B vocalist—Justin’s signature sound has found it’s way around the globe, many times over and over again. This rude, screamy, aggressive sum reserves its right to go anywhere it wants whenever it pleases.

Justin and I met backstage after Dead Cross played Denver last fall. It was the end of the night on the final date of the band’s first tour. Talking to Justin, I found myself surprised at how someone so pleasant could make such devastating music. A contradiction of sorts, I suppose, or maybe more so a product of my own misguided presumptions. Either way, my presumptions were busted into a thousand smithereens that night. Now, I’m honestly not sure if contradictions truly exist. Maybe things just go together and it’s not always up to us to make sense of them? Rather, we should just smile and say, “fuck yeah” when they feel right.

Veronika Sprinkel Ink. proudly presents an interview with legendary hardcore musician, Justin Pearson. A conversation about ethics, origins, and some other stuff. Enjoy.

Text and interview by Veronika Sprinkel



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An Interview with Justin Pearson


As a musical genre, punk’s not commonly considered to be riddled with nuance, suggestion, or surprise. What you see is what you get. It’s either on or it’s off. Loud or louder. Rude, bombastic, brutal, or all of the above. Like it or go the fuck home. But every now and then, someone or something comes along, to challenge all you thought you knew about anything ever. Enter Mr. Justin Pearson.

By the impressionable age of twelve, Justin had infiltrated Phoenix, Arizona’s hardscrabble punk rock scene. Going to shows like Suicidal Tendencies and Fugazi, Justin’s moral, social, and political points of view began taking shape. A code of ethics formed around the chaos of his internal and external worlds; and it wasn’t long before this shitty, pissed-off kid figured out that punk is far more than just some fleeting rebellious veneer. It’s a way of life, requiring absolute independence while maintaining respect for yourself and your environment.

Over the past 20 years, Justin Pearson has become one of hardcore’s most formidable figures. Owner of Three One G Records; bassist for bands like Dead Cross, The Locust, and Head Wound City; Retox and Planet B vocalist—Justin’s signature sound has found it’s way around the globe, many times over and over again. This rude, screamy, aggressive sum reserves its right to go anywhere it wants whenever it pleases.

Justin and I met backstage after Dead Cross played Denver last fall. It was the end of the night on the final date of the band’s first tour. Talking to Justin, I found myself surprised at how someone so pleasant could make such devastating music. A contradiction of sorts, I suppose, or maybe more so a product of my own misguided presumptions. Either way, my presumptions were busted into a thousand smithereens that night. Now, I’m honestly not sure if contradictions truly exist. Maybe things just go together and it’s not always up to us to make sense of them? Rather, we should just smile and say, “fuck yeah” when they feel right.

Veronika Sprinkel Ink. proudly presents an interview with legendary hardcore musician, Justin Pearson. A conversation about ethics, origins, and some other stuff. Enjoy.

Text and interview by Veronika Sprinkel



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Turnstile – Time & Space


Band: Turnstile
Album: Time & Space
Label: Roadrunner Records
Release date: March 2018
Sounds like: melodic/dance party hardcore bro anthems of ’18. 

Making a name for yourself in modern hardcore is a difficult prospect, so that’s probably why Maryland’s Turnstile sound like an oldball mix of 311/Madball/Suicide Machines and bizarrely, Status Quo (more on that later) in order to carve their name into this overflowing musical landscape. Time & Space is their second album, hot on the heels of the arm-flailing, windmill-a-thon of Nonstop Feeling from 2015 and makes significant strides forward in places to be something slightly different from the norm.

There’s a distinct rap-rock feel to opening track Real Thing – the riffs and heavily accentuated bass are straight out of the Rage Against The Machine rule book of crunchy, mouth-watering guitar tones. Coupled with the melancholic backing vocal haunts alongside vocalist Brendan Yates and his unique, snapping howls this is a raucous and stubborn statement of intent.

The mic-swinging savagery of Big Smile can barely contain itself. The breathless ruin drummer Daniel Fang puts his kit through is teeth-rattling in the ferocity stakes. About 33 seconds in Turnstile appear to transform into Status Quo. Where that riff comes from, I’ll never know, but you can actually hear the guitar laughing with pure, unashamed pride – it’s a pure surf-rock, party slammer of sun-drenched fun and is aching to be another minute longer to make everything even more ridiculous. The posturing rap-hardcore stomp of Generator, is an absolute barnstomer, making the simple statement of how Yates is going it alone and moves through several stages, from the sudden shift to a more atmospheric, almost dub/shoegaze interlude that then throws you back into some chugging, melodic post-hardcore, complete with handclaps, a guitar solo and some morose and wistful vocals from Yates, who shows a lot more depth than his usual snarling bark.

On Time & Space, there’s plenty of gusto, passion, vigour that elevate this above a lot of other hardcore punk. Turnstile have crafted an album that bubbles with passion, raw feeling and life.

You know what we need more of, one note piano choruses in things! The ripping punk rock splatter of High Pressure delivers this in such a bizarre and wonderful way, you’ll be stabbing that imagery key with all your energy. The lurching roar of the song’s macho and large ham coda adds even more beef and volatile substance to Turnstile’s meaty hardcore swagger.

Moon gives the opportunity for bassist Franz Lyons to step behind the mic and show off his Michael Graves-sounding vocal chords, giving this track a mournful and sombre feel. It’s in stark contrast to the snapping bark of lead vocalist Brendan Yates and it works with Turnstile’s high-fives and stage-dives sound perfectly. The trouble with Moon is, immediately after hearing it, you want Lyons singing something else (he was also lead on Blue By You from their debut) his voice adds a different dynamic (not to say Yates isn’t doing a great job) but more variation in the vocal stakes is something Turnstile have overlooked on Time & Space and this track is one of their best works committed to tape.

Never drive your car to Come Back For More – there’s a chance you’ll be banned for life, such is the speed on this – see also the aggressive gait of the bro-core flamboyance of the noisy, Helmet-esque Can’t Get Away filled with some extra handclaps and squealing metallic guitar licks to confuse and surprise you at every turn. That’s what Time & Space does though – the hardcore-by-numbers feels so at home, but soon begins to flake, chipped apart by these erratic snippets that cut and chop away; similar to how The Chariot made their final album, One Wing so vital and interesting. I mean, Diplo – yes, that Diplo adds his producing skills to one track on this, the scrawling slam-pit rock bastard that is Right To Be; and why not because that’s not weird? The overly-synthesized vocals on the anthemic chorus, give it an unstable electro-rock feel, but the gang vocal chants of “THEY WANT TO TAKE! MY RIGHT TO BE!” are pure hardcore unity. It’s jarring, eccentric and…well, it works, I guess?

On Time & Space, there’s plenty of gusto, passion, vigour and little touches that elevate this above a lot of other hardcore punk, (notably, the superb production from Will Yip) meaning that Turnstile have crafted an album that boils and bubbles with passion, raw feeling and the adrenaline-pounding thump of life. For fans of modern hardcore, such as Touche Amore, Terrible Love, Show Me The Body and Trapped Under Ice – Turnstile are definitely pushing boundaries it feels, but perhaps need to lean a bit harder in certain places to completely break through to the other side. Whatever the case, Time & Space is bloody brilliant fun and one of my highlights of 2018.

Top tracks: Big Smile, Moon, High Pressure, Right To Be

Links

Turnstile
Turnstile Facebook
Roadrunner Records

Lizard Hips

Lizard Hips

Junior Vice President of Keep It Fast. In other news: I work in social media, talk about dinosaurs, run a book club and have amazing facial hair. I am also a male man who is still not dead.

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