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Hot Snakes – Jericho Sirens


Band: Hot Snakes
Album: Jericho Sirens
Label: Sub Pop
Release date: March 2018
Sounds like: Forgetting your insulin, AGAIN. A hatchet job. Mystery Boys. 

Everyone, Hot Snakes are back, and not just in pog form! I cannot tell you how much I’ve missed this sound. With Obits, frontman Rik Froberg retained some of that tense, scattergun guitar noise, but without his partner in musical crime, aka John “Speedo” Reis, it just wasn’t the same. Couple their six strings together and you get something that apparently owes lots to The Wipers – add in Gar Wood on bass, Jason Kourkounis and Mario Rubalcaba on drums and you’ve something truly incredible.

Whilst Jericho Sirens is typically a Hot Snakes record, time has obviously honed this well-oiled machine, (14 years to be precise) and you’ve something that takes elements from all their past records – the ripping chaos of Automatic Midnight, the experimental darkness of Suicide Invoice and the meaty crunch of Audit In Progress. So, it’s the perfect Hot Snakes record, right? I’m not saying that, but neither am I saying it isn’t. With Speedo’s Rocket From The Crypt touring, releasing mysterious 7″ records, and his and Froberg’s Drive Like Jehu teasing us with sporadic shows, having Hot Snakes back is mouth-watering to say the least.

Jericho Sirens is a bludgeoning, dangerous and deadly beast of a record and the 14 years have been well worth the wait – you need this in your ears right now…

Jericho Sirens opens with the shrieking, stocky guitars of I Need A Doctor, which sounds eerily like If Credits What Matters I’ll Take Credit from their debut, but at a slower speed, but with more seething bile, courtesy of the pipes of Froberg. Time hasn’t weathered those vocal chords one bit – it’s still that same scrappy, raw, hacking sound, especially the way he roars the song’s title “I need a doctor/Tell me what I’m gonna do? I need a doctor/One you can direct me to?” As an opener, it scorches the land with this shredding, wailing caterwaul of the twin Swami-guitars not to mention the howling synth lines echoing in the background. The pace then takes an erratic jolt on the chopped up stagger that is Candid Cameras; percussion is disjointed, irregular and overtly complex, giving nods to the lurching post-punk of the aforementioned Drive Like Jehu which should please fans of the math-rock titans.

Hot Snakes don’t want you to feel any sort of comfort or relaxation though – oh no. Despite them perfecting this particular sound, you would think “okay, I know what’s coming” but you really have no idea – it’s the way they manipulate and attack their sound that sets it apart. Take the 78 second burst of noise that is Why Don’t It Sink In? – it’s pure thrash-trash punk fury, urgent, breathless, sweaty and destructive. It seethes with teeth-gnashing urgency and spitting venom and seems to be in a race to reach the sudden exhaustive conclusion as it smashes into the wall and owes a lot to the speed that made their debut, Automatic Midnight, so vital and vibrant.

The surf-rock vibes on the radiant Six Wave Hold-Down perfectly encapsulates the cover of Jericho Sirens (Gar Wood catching a rip curl, right?) and brings to mind the snarling, tense punk of their work on Audit In Progress, whilst the summer-punk rock of Death Camp Fantasy, has the brilliant call and response from Froberg in the form of: “Have I, been preyed upon? EVERYBODY!” queue the rest of the band screaming the words back at him. There’s your fucking crowd favourite right there.

There’s many of them on this, but the standout track has to be the weighty heft of the title track. As the harmonica creeps in (hello I Hate The Kids) as do those lurching, staggering riffs that don’t let up during this 4 minute barrage of dark, menacing, but upbeat fortitude. Chances are you will have Froberg’s words of “Jericho Sirens, I hear…” firmly ear-wormed into you head by the track’s raucous and punishing conclusion. Easily one of the best songs they’ve ever recorded – up there with Salton City and 10th Planet for sheer heaviness and crunching power.

The ripping chug of the incandescent Psychoactive bristles with hair-raising power-chords and those trademark churning, rolling, finger-bleeding riffs – meaning you’ll be grinning from ear to ear on this one, especially every time Froberg yells the words “I WANT SUCCESS!” – cracking. Jericho Sirens closes with the rambunctious salvo of Death of a Sportsman, a bouncing, scrappy punk number that gives huge nods to Let It Come in structure, with Gar Wood’s booming bass thundering the track forward, backed by the solid drumming power of Kourkounis and Rubalcaba. It’s the sinister guitar lines that haunt this in the background though – coupled with the return of the squealing harmonica and the foreboding suzzy-punk rock drive.

Hot Snakes redefined punk for me when I first discovered them in 2004, and remain an important, volatile and deadly combination of razor sharp guitar lines, sardonic lyrical couplets and brutally fast rhythmic punches to the face, gut, hell the entire body. Jericho Sirens is a bludgeoning, dangerous and deadly beast of a record and the 14 years have been well worth the wait – you need this in your ears right now.

You can purchase Jericho Sirens from Sub Pop or stream via bandcamp below.

 

Top tracks: I Need A Doctor, Six Wave Hold-Down, Jericho Sirens, Death Camp Fantasy, Psychoactive, Death of a Sportsman

Links

Hot Snakes
Hot Snakes Bandcamp
Sub Pop

Lizard Hips

Lizard Hips

Junior Vice President of Keep It Fast. In other news: I work in social media, talk about dinosaurs, run a book club and have amazing facial hair. I am also a male man who is still not dead.

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An Interview with Justin Pearson


As a musical genre, punk’s not commonly considered to be riddled with nuance, suggestion, or surprise. What you see is what you get. It’s either on or it’s off. Loud or louder. Rude, bombastic, brutal, or all of the above. Like it or go the fuck home. But every now and then, someone or something comes along, to challenge all you thought you knew about anything ever. Enter Mr. Justin Pearson.

By the impressionable age of twelve, Justin had infiltrated Phoenix, Arizona’s hardscrabble punk rock scene. Going to shows like Suicidal Tendencies and Fugazi, Justin’s moral, social, and political points of view began taking shape. A code of ethics formed around the chaos of his internal and external worlds; and it wasn’t long before this shitty, pissed-off kid figured out that punk is far more than just some fleeting rebellious veneer. It’s a way of life, requiring absolute independence while maintaining respect for yourself and your environment.

Over the past 20 years, Justin Pearson has become one of hardcore’s most formidable figures. Owner of Three One G Records; bassist for bands like Dead Cross, The Locust, and Head Wound City; Retox and Planet B vocalist—Justin’s signature sound has found it’s way around the globe, many times over and over again. This rude, screamy, aggressive sum reserves its right to go anywhere it wants whenever it pleases.

Justin and I met backstage after Dead Cross played Denver last fall. It was the end of the night on the final date of the band’s first tour. Talking to Justin, I found myself surprised at how someone so pleasant could make such devastating music. A contradiction of sorts, I suppose, or maybe more so a product of my own misguided presumptions. Either way, my presumptions were busted into a thousand smithereens that night. Now, I’m honestly not sure if contradictions truly exist. Maybe things just go together and it’s not always up to us to make sense of them? Rather, we should just smile and say, “fuck yeah” when they feel right.

Veronika Sprinkel Ink. proudly presents an interview with legendary hardcore musician, Justin Pearson. A conversation about ethics, origins, and some other stuff. Enjoy.

Text and interview by Veronika Sprinkel



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An Interview with Justin Pearson


As a musical genre, punk’s not commonly considered to be riddled with nuance, suggestion, or surprise. What you see is what you get. It’s either on or it’s off. Loud or louder. Rude, bombastic, brutal, or all of the above. Like it or go the fuck home. But every now and then, someone or something comes along, to challenge all you thought you knew about anything ever. Enter Mr. Justin Pearson.

By the impressionable age of twelve, Justin had infiltrated Phoenix, Arizona’s hardscrabble punk rock scene. Going to shows like Suicidal Tendencies and Fugazi, Justin’s moral, social, and political points of view began taking shape. A code of ethics formed around the chaos of his internal and external worlds; and it wasn’t long before this shitty, pissed-off kid figured out that punk is far more than just some fleeting rebellious veneer. It’s a way of life, requiring absolute independence while maintaining respect for yourself and your environment.

Over the past 20 years, Justin Pearson has become one of hardcore’s most formidable figures. Owner of Three One G Records; bassist for bands like Dead Cross, The Locust, and Head Wound City; Retox and Planet B vocalist—Justin’s signature sound has found it’s way around the globe, many times over and over again. This rude, screamy, aggressive sum reserves its right to go anywhere it wants whenever it pleases.

Justin and I met backstage after Dead Cross played Denver last fall. It was the end of the night on the final date of the band’s first tour. Talking to Justin, I found myself surprised at how someone so pleasant could make such devastating music. A contradiction of sorts, I suppose, or maybe more so a product of my own misguided presumptions. Either way, my presumptions were busted into a thousand smithereens that night. Now, I’m honestly not sure if contradictions truly exist. Maybe things just go together and it’s not always up to us to make sense of them? Rather, we should just smile and say, “fuck yeah” when they feel right.

Veronika Sprinkel Ink. proudly presents an interview with legendary hardcore musician, Justin Pearson. A conversation about ethics, origins, and some other stuff. Enjoy.

Text and interview by Veronika Sprinkel



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The Chats – Get This In Ya!!


Band: The Chats
EP: Get This In Ya!!
Label: Burger Records
Release date: July 2017
Sounds like: ??? I’m on smoko, so leave me alone. 

At the risk of letting this pass without acknowledging it, I feel the internet and everyone involved needs to know more about the sheer brilliance of The Chats. Their name comes  from Chatswood, in Sydney and the word chat is also a derogatory term according to urban dictionary and basically means, “shit” so the band are called The Shits?! Yeah? Yeah.

Why should we care about them? Well, for the simple reason they’re bloody great, mate. The simplicity of their pop-punk, is edged with this scuzzy, Sub Pop-90s sound, courtesy of the belching bass guitar of singer Eamon Sandwith and the trash-punk drumming of Matthew Boggis, plus the guitars of Josh Price and Tremayne McCarthy which alter between a low-fi punk scrape to a thrashing mash up of stupid gurgling riffs.

A lot of their songs seem to be about having nothing to do. Smoko, for example, is a 3 minute pop-rock banger about taking a smoke break and it’s absolutely excellent, right down to the infectious opening bass riff, to the video that was probably made for about $5 after a night on a lot of beers. The brilliantly unnervingly funny ending features singer Eamon, seeing someone needing lifeguard assistance, but he’s  “on smoko, so leave me alone.” If anything, the video is going to make you want a sausage roll.

Other tracks are just as amusing, such as Nambored (which is about Nambour, and being bored there). a two minute tuneful blast of only having 7 bucks, and not being able to take the boredom and frustration anymore (but at least you can walk to a Macca’s). The bro-anthem of How Many Do You Do is an absolute killer, (thanks to that bass line) and is all about hanging out with The Chats crew, smoking a few darts and generally having a great time!

They say write about what you know, and The Chats seem to do that – Bus Money is all about spending all your cash on six packs, shitty pills and scratch cards (sounds good to me) all delivered in this wonderful Australian drawl. “I spent my bus money on a sausage roll, I’d have more money if I wasn’t on the dole!” sneers Sandwith on Bus Money, ending with the pleading chant of “ALL I NEED IS A BUCK OR TWO!” a sure fire live favourite right there.

Thing get a bit more serious (only just) on the anti-security guard spit of Nazi March – NOFX song in disguise and a full middle finger to fascist bullshit, something which The Chats don’t have time for and the tongue-in-cheek chant of “left-right, left-right” only adds to their cutting venom.

Struggling with a illness is the subject matter of Temperature, with the words of “have you got a fever? Will you let me feel ya?” from Sandwith on this gritty post-punk slab of noise, completed by some great snarling backing vocals and snotty, brackish Shitty Limits-esque fury.

So, let your hair grow out into a fashionable mullet, grab your surf rescue top and a packet of darts and rock the fuck out with The Chats, the greatest band ever in this small time frame until the next one comes along. Also, I cannot stress how much these guys need to come over to the UK and smash up one of our tiny venues.

You can stream/buy/get the beers in and enjoy The Chats below or buy it on a fucking tape from Burger Records, yeah? Get ready to pay about £100 postage.

 

Links

The Chats
The Chats Soundcloud
Burger Records

Lizard Hips

Lizard Hips

Junior Vice President of Keep It Fast. In other news: I work in social media, talk about dinosaurs, run a book club and have amazing facial hair. I am also a male man who is still not dead.

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Thisquietarmy – Conqueror: 2009​-​2017


We have already covered the music of Canadian solo artist Eric Quach as thisquietarmy and while we mostly love his records, what we love more is that he tours a lot. Eric (who coincidentally has a birthday while this piece is taking shape, happy birthday, mate!) is still based in Canada but each year he finds a way to reach Europe for at least two-three months. Moreover, it’s never only about the easy accessible and well-paid spots. thisquietarmy has reached all corners of the world where his music was wanted and appreciated. To finalize his DIY profile, Eric is operating his own imprint TQA Records and is mainly self-releasing or co-releasing his albums. He still books himself and is the living proof DIY is the way.

Late last year, thisquietarmy published the book Conqueror: 2009​-​2017. As you can see from the photos it’s an epic effort. The book offers a huge selection of photographs accompanying the short tour stories Eric Quach has featured in the book. Conqueror: 2009​-​2017 has documented 8 years of thisquietarmy’s life as a full-time touring act. The pages of the book will tell you the stories about 17 tours, 500 shows and 35 countries in North and South America, Asia and Europe. This is shown in over 1000 photographs and a tour diary of over 30,000 words.

If I have to be completely honest, when I first learned about the book and got it few weeks later it did feel a bit as an overkill. I thought it was too megalomaniac, too big. I thought it could have been made shorter. Yes, it’s a beast of a book, larger than the regular format and I guess, expensive to manufacture. However, several hours within its world proved me wrong. It was totally worth it and wouldn’t be the same if it wasn’t so extensive! Eight years of touring is hell a lot of work, effort, patience, struggle and of course all the rewarding joy of having the freedom to share your art with the world. If Eric Quach was able to endure all of this, in both good and bad, well, I think we can manage 480 pages of beautiful shots and personal recollections.

Conqueror: 2009​-​2017 also comes with a flexi containing the self-titled track. I’m familiar with pretty much the full thisquietarmy catalog as I’ve been observing Eric’s work for years, but this short piece is definitely a highlight in his discography. It starts quiet, feels self-reflective but eventually turns epic and somehow triumphant. Just let it loop while you’re enjoying the book.

There are still copies of Conqueror: 2009​-​2017 on Bandcamp. Oh yes, you might as well want to catch thisquietarmy live. He’s touring again already.



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American Nightmare – S/T | KEEP IT FAST, Progressive, Comedy, Hardcore, Thrash, Punk, News, Reviews and Latest Tracks


Band: American Nightmare
Album: S/T
Label: Rise Records
Release date: 16 February
Sounds like: Love American. Hearts. Death.

Hell is hot but I’m keeping cool” intones vocalist Wes Eisold, his nonchalant swagger is apparent on the savage The World Is Blue, the first explosive track from American Nightmares new album, their first in 15 years. This is a massive deal in hardcore circles, as the Boston crew have been through the ringer with name changes, legal disputes, break ups and a revolving door of band members. Thankfully, 2018 means a rebirth if you like, with frontman and creator, Eisold, guitarist Brian Masek, bassist Josh Holden and drummer Alex Garcia-Rivera, who all played on 2003’s We’re Down ‘Til We’re Underground.

Throughout Wes Eisold’s work, the theme of love burns a huge scorching hole in the landscape and never lets up for one moment. His lyrics have always dwelled in the realms of loss, despair, fear and melancholy – however, there’s one emotion that never backs down – the aforementioned love. It bleeds heavily, seeping into all the nooks and cracks within American Nightmare, during its brief running time and it’s enough to make a statement about their world and their resurrection.

American Nightmare contains some of Eisold’s best singing to date – his voice sounds huge, powerful and edged with emotional uncertainty and cutting sarcasm…

I do love how immediate and raging the opening track, The World Is Blue is – full force, no bullshit, jaw ripped from your face and flung into the ocean. Eisold’s scream of “Salvation! Salvation!” like some fanatical preacher (hey Megachurch, get sampling) only adds to the boisterous, enlightening zeal, whilst the gurgling-bass led section of “I see the sun shining down on me” is a brilliant and exhausting final 15 seconds of madness, ending with the crushing lament that “we are nowhere.

It’s like a chase and you’ve got to keep running if you want to stay ahead of the game and second track, Flowers Under Siege, seems to end before it even begins – half the track is a made up of feedback, whilst the mid-20 seconds are a short, sharp, electrifying blast of stripped-back punk rock delivered with spitting, venomous gusto and acerbic, chaotic lust.

Rage builds and builds on the hate-filled American Death; the opening line begins with the spitting “fuck everyone I’ve ever known/spineless bastard slithers home” and only continues to get more wrought and furious. The gang-vocal chants of “days upon” and the end line, in the form of the caustic and oddly humorous “I hope you live forever/cause your life’s worse than death” is a sardonic and withering “fuck you”. A venting, ranting attack to the senses, drenched in raw, bleeding emotion. There’s more to follow with scream of “Don’t forget that the world’s against us/there’s no place I would rather be” on the cutting salvo of War, a track edged with subtle conflict and cries of togetherness and abject dissolution. Props to the rhythm section of Garcia-Rivera and Holden, who thump out an impressive and sturdy hardcore backbone to this pulverising chunk of bludgeoning and scathing torment.

The criminally short running time of some of these tracks makes the whole experience one big tease in places. See the breakneck first minute of Lower Than Life – led by Garcia-Rivera’s euphoric percussion, it clatters through with a thrash-punk attack, before switching up to a swaggering, mic-swinging blast of anthemic gang-vocal glory. The repeated roars of “Deeper than hell/lower than life” cement this as a sure live favourite but tantalisingly finish far too soon.

Interestingly, you can see where a number of Eisold’s past and current projects have had an influence too – from the short sharp burst of 36 second scraping hardcore bile of Dream, (hello Some Girls) completed by a ridiculously short guitar solo to the dramatic goth-rock Colder Than Death – with the overlapping backing vocals, drenched in Eisold’s melancholy gloom, that grinding bass opening rumble and the spaced out, post-hardcore guitar wails, giving it a harder-edged Cold Cave feel.

Another thing to note, the production on American Nightmare is beautiful – credit to drummer Alex Garcia-Rivera for his work on this and the mastering was by Bob Weston? DUDES. Nice one. Also, easily some of Eisold’s best singing to date – his voice sounds huge, powerful and edged with emotional uncertainty and cutting sarcasm.

American Nightmare have created a document that is 9 tales of brutally honest, impassioned, chaotic, diverse and gut-wrenching rock, sealed with a heart to the world of hardcore. Open it and absorb its twisted poetry and noise.

Who cares when forever ends.”

Top tracks: Lower Than Life, Flowers Under Siege, War, The World Is Blue

Links

American Nightmare
Cold Cave
Rise Records

Lizard Hips

Lizard Hips

Junior Vice President of Keep It Fast. In other news: I work in social media, talk about dinosaurs, run a book club and have amazing facial hair. I am also a male man who is still not dead.

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Label feature: Tapetalks


Ukraine is a country that feels so close and so far in the same time. My first and only visit there so far happened last August. I spent a few days in the beautiful and calm capital city of Kiyv. While back then I was digging in what it was a part of the city and country’s experimental electronic music scene this article is actually dedicated to a topic closer to DIY Conspiracy – punk. At least to the outside observer, the country is blooming with (hardcore) punk bands (Reminded, Clearsight, Tank-2000, Bluesbreaker), shows and nice festivals like Маяк or Cobra Fest.

Cool Jerks – Patriots (2017)

For this feature we go to Odessa where Tapetalks is based. This comparative young label is focused on releasing limited cassette tapes. Curious enough the current Tapetalks roster is not formed of local bands (the city actually has an abundance of those with Homesick, Supression and Flame to name a few). Similar to Bulgaria’s Ugly and Proud Records, which operate almost exclusively on an international level, the focus of Tapetalks are bands from abroad. In their catalog you find bands from Australia, England, Germany and Russia. The releases look and sound fantastic, some are accompanied by extensive booklets and all feature great artwork. No compromises are made with the paper or the print quality. The runs are far from being super limited, but are just enough to make you go for the tapes as soon as they’re out.

EX-DOG – Angry & Hungry (2016)

Let’s take a quick look at their catalog before we send you on a shopping spree in the Tapetalks Bandcamp page.

Bikini Cops – Three (2018)

Coming out of Perth, Australia, Bikini Cops sound exactly as their name suggests – 1980s influenced punk, hating the world, hating the system, not afraid to draw their eyes from the ugly world to what hides in ourselves and try to find there the key for a better future. The release will take 10 minutes of your life, but then another 10 and another 10. Only if Perth wasn’t so damn far from here. That band is surely a blast live.

Cold Leather – Past Remedy (2017)

Released late last year we’re sure most zines were too busy writing end-of-the-year lists instead of going for something fresh, in this case, as fresh as 1980s US punk can get. Past Remedy is a groovy and dancable punk three-tracker with old school sound, reverby shouty but melodic vocals and naughty bass lines.

Cool Jerks – Patriots (2017) & Demo (2016)

Tapetalks have only six releases (a new one is coming as I write this) but England’s Cool Jerks can be already called regulars in the label as their 2016 demo was actually the first cassette that got published. Patriots follow what that demo had already started. Mid paced tracks taking turns with faster ones, lyrics and tracks about our shared daily struggles but performed and recorded so loyally to the past of punk music that you can’t stay neutral to it no matter how many bands of that era or contemporary worshippers have you heard.

Cool Jerks and their two releases are definitely future Tapetalks classics!

KÜKEN – KÜKEN (2016)

Germany’s KÜKEN and their self-titled album on Tapetalks is without a doubt my favorite of the current catalog of the label. From the awesome artwork to the introvert and personal raw punk breathing the air of the late 1970s there’s no track in this album that’s not a banger. While other releases sometimes might feel a bit short KÜKEN is as long as it should be, as emotionally charged as it should be but just enough nihilist. Excuse me, now I gotta polish my boots.

EX-DOG – Angry & Hungry (2016)

EX-DOG are the winners with the dopest artwork on Tapetalks. They’re hailing from Moscow, Russia and are melodic as hell. Emotional punk rock at its finest, definitely among the top releases at Tapetalks. Can’t believe it’s not sold out yet!



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XclusivX Fanzine #10 is here


The only thing getting me almost as excited as when a new record pops up in the mail or I bargain for an old video game is getting my hands on some good reading material. In this week’s zine batch I found the 10th issue of XclusivX fanzine. I’ve missed the first 4-5 issues of this one, but Nikolay at Ugly and Proud Records has been regularly stocking the latest output of the zine and I managed to quickly catch up.

If you already know and love XclusivX I guess we can all agree they’re doing a great job with both design and content. Sadly, according to the XclusivX #10 intro the zine will have to go in a hiatus for a bit, but we hope it’s not gone for good because the zine scene needs issues like this. With a strong focus on straight edge, veganism, feminism and animal rights, XclusivX #10 once again perfectly balances between interviews with all kinds of people, from all kinds of scenes, but firmly related to DIY punk, hardcore and all branching subcultures.

There’s tons of recipes, lengthy talks about music (great to see Ecostrike on this one, after the dope Wake of Humanity interview in XclusivX #9) and a total highlight in this issue was the story of Little Rainbow Sanctuary. The photos on this one are also amazing and hearth-warming. I’m totally out of the Instagram hype so the #instavegans section is the sole thing I kind of dislike about the zine in general. The whole idea of putting on paper something related to IG feels weird but hey, there’s still a cool cause I can see behind it. And honestly, I’d truly prefer a newsfeed full of food photos, recipes or video games than a feed full of semi-naked humans jerking off to their followers count and ‘amazing and flawless’ lives that actually nobody should care about.

Won’t be spoiling your time with the zine by adding too much photos, but I’m sure the ones I took will make you order one right away. I honestly have no clue how you can order a copy online, but their Facebook link is right above, you can always write them an email and I’m sure, if the run is not sold out yet, they’ll hook you up with a copy. Another thing you can do is pinch your local hardcore punk distro and if they’re as cool as ours you’ll soon have some proper stuff to read while cooking.

P.S. After I posted this, I found the XclusivX online store and it seems #10 is already sold out. So, rush to the distros, people. We know at least one that has copies. *wink wink*



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Tiny Moving Parts – Swell


a2334147848_10Band: Tiny Moving Parts
Album: Swell
Label: Big Scary Monsters
Release date: January 2018
Sounds like: Sending applause to your heartstrings. A rapid detachment.

“Scan an open road, distort the traffic/Never getting used to these second guesses…”

Due to mishearing lyrics, I thought that on Malfunction, track 8 from the new Tiny Moving Parts album, Swell, vocalist Dylan Mattheisen said “I got dizzy right before the vapid detachments.” I thought “hell, that’s a terrific band name, The Vapid Detachments*!” However, I’m reliably informed that the word is rapid, which is still decent, if not better? Probably?

Tiny Moving Parts then, completed by the brothers Chevalier (Matt on bass, Billy on drums) are back with the follow up to 2016’s Celebrate and their second release through the Big Scary Monsters imprint. It’s quite an impressive move by BSM main man, Kevin to sign these dudes a few years back – they tick a lot of boxes and overlap into several others. Twiddly-math-emo styles? Check. Huge punk rock choruses that feel like a bone-crunching hug of joy? You betcha. An impassioned and earnest vocal lead that makes your heart…er…swell? Thumbs up.

Opening track Applause, asks for veritable ovation be sent to your heartstrings. There’s an edge of darkness in this though, whilst the twinkling guitars, math-punk riffs, scattered percussion and plethora of tambourines litter this, Mattheisen’s cries of “I want to give up” and the line “struggle with every single breath” seem to hold some desire to overcome and breakthrough a period of sadness. Luckily, the cry of “applause my lungs still breathing” on every single one of this song’s damn hook-laden choruses makes the glass seem half-full.

Building bridges is the topic of the soaring Smooth It Out – a track that seems to be about improving a relationship, talk of missteps and “smoke breaks” (taking time out) and offering to be the “weight on your shoulders” hey, it’s about love everyone! Aw. Mattheisen and the Chevalier boys carve out a crackling slab of spirited up-tempo heartland rock, which bursts with even more vigour thanks to the rising background strings/(keys?) and subtle gang-vocal melodies.

The jagged, punchy guitars on the aggravated Feel Alive, give the track a crisp, yet busy feel, whilst Mattheisen’s breathless and erratic vocals compliment the title incredibly well (fella really does want to feel alive it seems). Bloody love the underused additional vocals from Kelc Galluzzo and her call-and-response of “I still miss you.” Kind of makes me think of the additional vocals on High Speed from the Single Mothers album from last year; i.e. not used enough – more of this please.

Caution could well be your favourite single of 2018 and we’ve not even made it through February yet! That mathy-guitar 40 seconds in will do it, or even the massive chorus hook of “I’m still waiting…FOR A SLIGHT BREAK!” or maybe it’s the brilliant video? Whatever it is, this is indeed, love.

Someday we’re all going to die…but not tonight!” shouts Matthesien on the discordant but emo-rock-tastic Wildlife, showcasing how Tiny Moving Parts are striving to create huge fucking slogans to be shouted during their live shows, and all power to them for it. There’s a jagged urgency to the stumbling and frantic Whale Watching, whilst the riff-laden scuzz of Malfunction sets a more aggressive tone, especially the lyrics, with cries of frost filling Matthesien’s head and the repeated scream of “it’s a message” which you can see hordes of fans at their shows bellowing back at the band – superb. Warm Hand Splash starts with an apology and launches headfirst into regret. Should we be happy? It asks for forgiveness, and brims with venting and rending gusto and some lush horn sections adding to the punchy and flamboyant emotional conclusion. The Hotelier are probably taking notes.

Tiny Moving Parts couldn’t have picked a better title for this collection of songs really. These 10 tracks on Swell are fit to burst with impassioned beauty, melancholy, tales of loss and re-connection; from their erratic time changes to the heady blasts of breakneck punk rock and contemplative, brooding lyrical couplets. Sure, it might be cheesy in places, but sometimes that’s what you need in order to feel and care a little too much.

You can purchase Swell by absolute top lads Tiny Moving Parts from Big Scary Monsters. Or stream below.

 

Top tracks: Swell It Out, Caution, Malfunction, Warm Hand Splash

Links

Tiny Moving Parts
Tiny Moving Parts Webstore
Big Scary Monsters

*Also, The Vapid/Rapid Detachments will be releasing their debut album in 2020.

Lizard Hips

Lizard Hips

Junior Vice President of Keep It Fast. In other news: I work in social media, talk about dinosaurs, run a book club and have amazing facial hair. I am also a male man who is still not dead.

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Tiny Moving Parts – Swell


Band: Tiny Moving Parts
Album: Swell
Label: Big Scary Monsters
Release date: January 2018
Sounds like: Sending applause to your heartstrings. A rapid detachment.

“Scan an open road, distort the traffic/Never getting used to these second guesses…”

Due to mishearing lyrics, I thought that on Malfunction, track 8 from the new Tiny Moving Parts album, Swell, vocalist Dylan Mattheisen said “I got dizzy right before the vapid detachments.” I thought “hell, that’s a terrific band name, The Vapid Detachments*!” However, I’m reliably informed that the word is rapid, which is still decent, if not better? Probably?

Tiny Moving Parts then, completed by the brothers Chevalier (Matt on bass, Billy on drums) are back with the follow up to 2016’s Celebrate and their second release through the Big Scary Monsters imprint. It’s quite an impressive move by BSM main man, Kevin to sign these dudes a few years back – they tick a lot of boxes and overlap into several others. Twiddly-math-emo styles? Check. Huge punk rock choruses that feel like a bone-crunching hug of joy? You betcha. An impassioned and earnest vocal lead that makes your heart…er…swell? Thumbs up.

Opening track Applause, asks for veritable ovation be sent to your heartstrings. There’s an edge of darkness in this though, whilst the twinkling guitars, math-punk riffs, scattered percussion and plethora of tambourines litter this, Mattheisen’s cries of “I want to give up” and the line “struggle with every single breath” seem to hold some desire to overcome and breakthrough a period of sadness. Luckily, the cry of “applause my lungs still breathing” on every single one of this song’s damn hook-laden choruses makes the glass seem half-full.

Building bridges is the topic of the soaring Smooth It Out – a track that seems to be about improving a relationship, talk of missteps and “smoke breaks” (taking time out) and offering to be the “weight on your shoulders” hey, it’s about love everyone! Aw. Mattheisen and the Chevalier boys carve out a crackling slab of spirited up-tempo heartland rock, which bursts with even more vigour thanks to the rising background strings/(keys?) and subtle gang-vocal melodies.

The jagged, punchy guitars on the aggravated Feel Alive, give the track a crisp, yet busy feel, whilst Mattheisen’s breathless and erratic vocals compliment the title incredibly well (fella really does want to feel alive it seems). Bloody love the underused additional vocals from Kelc Galluzzo and her call-and-response of “I still miss you.” Kind of makes me think of the additional vocals on High Speed from the Single Mothers album from last year; i.e. not used enough – more of this please.

Caution could well be your favourite single of 2018 and we’ve not even made it through February yet! That mathy-guitar 40 seconds in will do it, or even the massive chorus hook of “I’m still waiting…FOR A SLIGHT BREAK!” or maybe it’s the brilliant video? Whatever it is, this is indeed, love.

Someday we’re all going to die…but not tonight!” shouts Matthesien on the discordant but emo-rock-tastic Wildlife, showcasing how Tiny Moving Parts are striving to create huge fucking slogans to be shouted during their live shows, and all power to them for it. There’s a jagged urgency to the stumbling and frantic Whale Watching, whilst the riff-laden scuzz of Malfunction sets a more aggressive tone, especially the lyrics, with cries of frost filling Matthesien’s head and the repeated scream of “it’s a message” which you can see hordes of fans at their shows bellowing back at the band – superb. Warm Hand Splash starts with an apology and launches headfirst into regret. Should we be happy? It asks for forgiveness, and brims with venting and rending gusto and some lush horn sections adding to the punchy and flamboyant emotional conclusion. The Hotelier are probably taking notes.

Tiny Moving Parts couldn’t have picked a better title for this collection of songs really. These 10 tracks on Swell are fit to burst with impassioned beauty, melancholy, tales of loss and re-connection; from their erratic time changes to the heady blasts of breakneck punk rock and contemplative, brooding lyrical couplets. Sure, it might be cheesy in places, but sometimes that’s what you need in order to feel and care a little too much.

You can purchase Swell by absolute top lads Tiny Moving Parts from Big Scary Monsters. Or stream below.

 

Top tracks: Swell It Out, Caution, Malfunction, Warm Hand Splash

Links

Tiny Moving Parts
Tiny Moving Parts Webstore
Big Scary Monsters

*Also, The Vapid/Rapid Detachments will be releasing their debut album in 2020.

Lizard Hips

Lizard Hips

Junior Vice President of Keep It Fast. In other news: I work in social media, talk about dinosaurs, run a book club and have amazing facial hair. I am also a male man who is still not dead.

More PostsWebsite

Follow Me:
TwitterYouTube





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