Posted on

The Distillers reveal reunion tour dates


The Distillers announced their comeback through a social media teaser earlier this month, and now they’ve made the reunion official by revealing a string of upcoming tour dates.

(Read: The 10 Most Anticipated Punk Albums of 2018)

The trek kicks off April 25th in San Diego and concludes May 2nd in Dallas, after which the punk rockers will play Shaky Music Knees Festival. You can grab tickets here.

The Distillers 2018 Tour Dates:
04/25 – San Diego, CA @ The Casbah
04/27 – Santa Ana, CA @ The Observatory
04/28 – Phoenix, AZ @ Crescent Ballroom
04/28 – El Paso, TX @ Lowbrow Palace
05/01 – Austin, TX @ The Mohawk
05/02 – Dallas, TX @ The Curtain Club
05/04-6 – Atlanta, GA @ Shaky Music Knees Festival

The Brody Dalle-led band broke up in 2006 after releasing three studio albums: The Distillers, Sing Sing Death House, and Coral Fang. Details about a new record have yet to surface, but The Distillers have been hinting at new material through social media over the past several months.



Source link

Posted on

Friend of Kurt Cobain uploads rare Nirvana demo tapes to YouTube: Stream


The Observer is a YouTube account run by John Purkey, an old friend of Kurt Cobain and someone who’s spoken at length about Nirvana’s rise and fall. Purkey regularly posts new videos, many of which include insider info on the band.

As Alternative Nation points out, Purkey recently uploaded four videos containing cassette audio of Nirvana demos circa the late ’80s. Apparently given to him by Cobain himself, the tapes include early recordings of songs that would eventually make up Bleach, as well as material recorded with Dale Crover. Perhaps even more intriguing is audio of early, pre-Dave Grohl Nevermind recordings featuring Chad Channing on drums.

Altogether, there’s well over two hours of material to work through. While some of the audio has been heard before by fans, perhaps not quite in such a raw, unpolished state. You also (sadly? thankfully?) won’t find any pop punk a la Weezer.

Check out each tape below, including comments from Purkey himself and tracklists (courtesy of diligent YouTuber Cancer God).

First tape: 

“This is the first tape Kurt gave to me. Sound quality is not perfect but it’s not too bad. It is listenable. Paper cuts sounds a little warbaly at first and that is exactly how it was when Kurt gave it to me. I got used to it. It slowly becomes clear sounding.”

0:38 – “Paper Cuts”
05:03 – “Downer”
06:53 – “Beeswax”
09:52 – “Aero Zeppelin”
14:36 – “Floyd the Barber”
17:03 – “If You Must”
21:12 – Spank Thru
24:57 – “Mexican Seafood”
27:06 – “Pen Cap Chew”
30:06 – “Montage of Heck”

Second tape: 

00:47 – “Blandest”
04:37 – “Mr. Moustache”
08:23 – “Sifting Instrumental”
13:51 – “Blew”
16:52 – “Spank Thru”
20:08 – “Love Buzz” (Early Single Version?)
23:55 – “Big Cheese”

Third tape:

“This was the tape he gave me after they recorded songs for what would become Bleach.”

00:00 – Intro
01:39 – “Scoff”
06:02 – “Swap Meet”
09:17 – “Blew”
12:23 – “Love Buzz”
16:11 – “About a Girl”
19:27 – “Negative Creep”
22:02 – “School”
24:50 – “Big Long Now”

Fourth tape:

“Recorded with Chad produced by Butch Vig. I think it is known as the smart studio demo. Kurt started high speed dubbing at the beginning of pay to play. [You] can hear a slight glitch when he pressed the high speed button.”

00:00 – Intro
00:44 – “Immodium”
04:04 – “Pay to Play”
07:39 – “Sappy”
11:17 – “Polly”
14:19 – “In Bloom”
19:00 – “Lithium” (Mix 6)
23:31 – “Dive”

To further expound on the tapes, Purkey posted a video discussing their origins over the weekend:



Source link

Posted on

Playing Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” in major scale turns it into a summery pop punk anthem


Angsty, draped in flannel, and bred just a few hours from overcast Seattle, Nirvana were unmistakably the poster children for the grunge era. But what if Kurt Cobain, Dave Grohl, & co. had followed a much different path, one marked by a California beachside breeze and happier times?

Luckily for us, Vimeo user Sleep Good has imagined this alternate reality by transforming Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” classic from a raging, gritty rocker into a summery pop punk anthem. By using a major scale instead of the typical F minor one, gone is the 1991 original’s bite and bitterness, replaced instead by something akin to Weezer or Green Day.

According to Sleep Good’s bit of revisionist history, Nirvana would have been known as Nirvirna, the hit single would’ve been titled “Teen Sprite” (genius!), and their hometown would’ve been located much further down south in the sunny San Diego community of La Jolla.

Check it out below.

And here’s the original for comparison’s sake:



Source link

Posted on

The Distillers return, share epic video teaser: Watch


After releasing three kickass full-lengths, The Distillers hung up their studded leather jackets and called it quits in 2006. Lead singer Brody Dalle went on to form a new group called Spinnerette as well as put out her debut solo album, Diploid Love, in 2014. Now, with just one cryptic video teaser on Twitter, it appears The Distillers have announced their mighty return.

(Read: The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands)

The 35-second clip stars what looks to be Dalle, as she epically thrashes to and fro behind a mic stand. The whole thing is soundtracked by music that’s equally epic in nature, like the opening seconds of a punk rock rager that’s sure to destroy. Check it out below and get pumped for this Distillers comeback.

Over the last few months, the band has posted some pictures on Facebook further hinting that new material is on the way.



Source link

Posted on

FIDLAR cover Nirvana’s “Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle”: Stream


Photo by ​Philip Cosores

FIDLAR popped up at plenty of festivals while on the road last year, but the punk rockers had a relatively quiet 2017 on the new music front. They’re ripping right into 2018, however, as they’ve shared a cover of the Nirvana track “Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle”.

(Read: The 100 Best Pop Punk Bands)

Their version of the In Utero cut does a faithful job of recapturing the original’s rage in the confines of their own screeching style. Guitars are crunchier in the mix and the bridge adds spaced-out bends, but the Los Angeles outfit does Seattle proud with their rendition. Check it out via the YouTube player below — just beware of the NSFW images spliced in at blink-and-you’ll-miss-it intervals.

In a new interview with GQ, FIDLAR frontman Zac Carper revealed the band is in studio working on a follow-up to 2015’s Too. Meanwhile, the surviving members of Nirvana — Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic, and Pat Smear — reunited last month at a Foo Fighters concert in Eugene, Oregon.



Source link

Posted on

Top 50 Albums of 2017


Last year felt particularly cruel as we watched so many of our pop-culture icons get taken from us without warning. By December, we all yearned for a pause, an ending, a reset. However, none of the comfort that comes with the hopeful act of flipping a calendar page lasted long into 2017. Instead, we’ve felt the pain more acutely and more personally than a year ago. Most of us have witnessed our core values challenged, felt our realities shaken, and endured daily reminders that who we are in our most basic integrity remains very much at stake. For that reason, it’s been a year in which we’ve turned to music out of necessity perhaps more than ever. The albums you find on this list aren’t just records we admired or caught ourselves dancing to. In many cases, they’re part of the reason we’re still here. They’ve consoled and empowered us, understood how we’ve felt, and in a time of such ugly, bitter divisiveness, reminded us that we’re never truly alone in mind, heart, or spirit.

These are the 50 albums we’ve leaned on most this year. Here’s hoping they don’t have to do such heavy lifting in 2018.

–Matt Melis
Editorial Director

__________________________________________________________

50. Johnny Jewel – Windswept

windswept Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Los Angeles, California

The Gist: After placing Chromatics’ Dear Tommy in the Red Room, Italians Do It Better producer and multi-instrumentalist Johnny Jewel issued this daring solo album mostly inspired by his work behind the scenes on Twin Peaks: The Return.

Why It Rules: With Windswept, Jewel sounds more assured as a producer than ever, conjuring up a moody amalgamation of his signature brooding synthpop and a style of free-form jazz akin to David Lynch go-to Angelo Badalamenti.

Essential Tracks: “Windswept”, “Slow Dreams”, and “Between Worlds”

–Michael Roffman

__________________________________________________________

49. Oneohtrix Point Never – Good Time

good time oneohtrix soundtrack stream listen Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Wayland, Massachusetts

The Gist: Two years after the interstellar, metallic Garden of Delete, esoteric electronic experimentalist Daniel Lopatin (AKA Oneohtrix Point Never) returned to score a crime drama starring Robert Pattinson. Retaining his own burning palette and pushing it through a Vangelis/Carpenter mesh, Lopatin continues to find new ways to inject anxiety and awe under the skin.

Why It Rules: A somber, piano-heavy collaboration with Iggy Pop in which the Stooge dreams about petting crocodiles is a good place to start, but Lopatin delivers the high-voltage thrills all on his own.

Essential Tracks: “Hospital Escape / Access-A-Ride”, “The Acid Hits”, and “The Pure and the Damned”

–Lior Phillips

__________________________________________________________

48. Jay Som – Everybody Works

jay som everybody works Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Oakland, California

The Gist: Multiple-instrumentalist Melina Duterte (aka Jay Som) rode her production and recording acumen on debut LP, Turn Into, to a deal with indie major Polyvinyl for Everybody Works.

Why It Rules: In what can only be described as bedroom maximalism, Duterte dug her lyrics into the granular, banalities of existence and aimed her production at expansive soundscapes. On “The Bus Song”, Duterte sings, “I can be whoever I want to be,” and that’s exactly who she is on Everybody Works.

Essential Tracks: “The Bus Song”, “Everybody Works”, and “For Light”

–Geoff Nelson

__________________________________________________________

47. The JuJu – Exchange

the juju exchange shin maeng billboard embed Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Chicago, Illinois

The Gist: After rising to session-player fame by collaborating with Chance the Rapper, Kanye West, and Vic Mensa, 24-year-old trumpeter Segal (FKA Donnie Trumpet) wrangled three fellow Chicago musicians together to expand his interest in experimental jazz, ultimately showcasing how the backbeat of hip-hop’s new sound is worthy of its own spotlight.

Why It Rules: On their debut LP, The Juju Exchange follow in the footsteps of producers like Flying Lotus and Knxwledge — not in sound, but in audience awareness, drawing listeners out of their usual jazz associations and into a world of smooth, free-form, low-key musings that inspire with their use of ample space.

Essential Tracks: “The Circuit”, “We Good”, and “Morning Of”

–Nina Corcoran

__________________________________________________________

46. Hans Zimmer and Benjamin Wallfish – Blade Runner 2049

blade runner 2049 soundtrack artwork Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Santa Monica, California; London, United Kingdom

The Gist: All signs pointed to chaos when director Denis Villeneuve parted ways with composer Jóhann Jóhannsson at the 25th hour, but Hans Zimmer and Benjamin Wallfish rose up to the challenge with an unexpected Hail Mary score.

Why It Rules: In addition to time restraints, both Zimmer and Wallfish had to follow in the footsteps of Vangelis, whose original Blade Runner score remains inimitable. They succeeded with a follow-up that’s both reverent and wholly intimidating.

Essential Tracks: “Sea Wall”, “Rain”, and “Wallace”

–Michael Roffman

__________________________________________________________

45. Paramore – After Laughter

paramore after laughter download album stream mp3 Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Nashville, Tennessee

The Gist: Another lineup change and personal turmoil almost broke up Paramore, but Hayley Williams, Taylor York, and a returning Zac Farro came back stronger than ever to record their most pop-leaning album to date.

Why It Rules: On After Laughter, Paramore step completely away from their pop-punk origins and embrace the influences of Fleetwood Mac, Talking Heads, and Blondie. Catchy sing-along hooks and ’80s pop production combine for a bright, polished sound that barely conceals the heartbreak and pain in the lyrics underneath. Williams describes the album best with the catchphrase “cry hard, dance harder.”

Essential Tracks: “Rose Colored Boy”, “26”, and “Hard Times”

–Eddie Fu

__________________________________________________________

44. Khalid – American Teen

khalid american teen Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Fort Stewart, Georgia

The Gist: The 19-year-old R&B singer’s debut album builds from the buzzing lead single, “Location”, and demonstrates a strong grasp of the pulse of his generation without alienating a greater audience.

Why It Rules: Khalid’s silky-smooth voice and anthemic hooks combine with pop/R&B production for a fresh sound that doesn’t push the rookie too far outside his comfort zone. American Teen is a solid effort in its own right while also allowing plenty of room for growth as he comes of age.

Essential Tracks: “Young Dumb & Broke”, “Location”, and “8teen”

–Eddie Fu

__________________________________________________________

43. Phoenix – Ti Amo

phoenix ti amo Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Versailles, France

The Gist: Caught between the brutality of the Bataclan massacre and the subsequent ascent of France’s right-wing reactionaries, veteran synth rocker Thomas Mars and co. escaped the tension by looking backward via this Italo-disco ode to bygone Riviera summers.

Why It Rules: Released just in time for the warm-weather months, Ti Amo hit like the aural equivalent of a white wine spritzer: Singles “J-Boy” and “Ti Amo” bubble with a radio-ready fizz, while deeper cuts like “Tuttifrutti” and “Fleur De Lys” add a shade of heady longing to all that sunbaked pop.

Essential Tracks: “J-Boy”, “Tuttifrutti”, and “Fleur De Lys”

–Tyler Clark

__________________________________________________________

42. Migos – Culture

migos culture Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Atlanta, Georgia

The Gist: Riding high off the runaway hip-hop hit “Bad and Boujee”, the prodigious trio of Offset, Quavo, and Takeoff fully capitalized on that momentum with a splendid set of tracks that put even the best work in their mixtape-heavy discography on notice.

Why It Rules: Backed by a cadre of producers, including Metro Boomin and Zaytoven, the success-obsessed bars and hedonistic hooks of Culture perfectly encapsulate the breadth of trap music, from its hypnagogic highs to its unapologetic lows.

Essential Tracks: “Bad and Boujee”, “Slippery”, and “T-Shirt”

–Gary Suarez

__________________________________________________________

41. Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein – Stranger Things 2

stranger things 2 Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Austin, Texas

The Gist: Another season of Netflix’s Stranger Things means another vintage score from Survive’s own Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein, and that’s exactly what they dropped back in October ahead of the series’ highly anticipated premiere.

Why It Rules: A year has passed. They’re a little older. They’re a little wiser. No longer are they echoing the iconic sounds of John Carpenter or Goblin, but indulging in more modern fare like Bon Iver and M83. Hawkins has never sounded so hip.

Essential Tracks: “Eulogy”, “Eight Fifteen”, and “On the Bus”

–Michael Roffman

__________________________________________________________



Source link

Posted on

Guided By Voices announce new album, Space Gun, share the title track: Stream


Origins is a recurring new music feature in which an artist charts the influence of their latest hit single.

This year, Guided By Voices put out not just one, but two full-lengths in August By Cake (also their first-ever double album) and How Do You Spell Heaven. 2018 will see the alt-rock veterans extending their prolific streak, as they’re prepping a new record called Space Gun.

Described in a press release as “the fullest realization of [Robert] Pollard’s song talents, with the band firing on all cylinders,” it came together partially as a result of GBV’s August By Cake tour, which featured them equipped with an all-new lineup. “Pollard has acknowledged that this line-up’s adroit talents [provided by Doug Gillard and Kevin March and newcomers Mark Shue and Bobby Bare Jr.] pushes him to more daring and dizzying heights,” reads the PR.

In total, there are 15 tracks on Space Gun, many of which, as you’ll read below, were inspired by everything from kangaroos to instructional YouTube videos to English post-punk legends Wire. One of those, the opening title track, is being premiered by Consequence of Sound today. Following recorded sounds of an airport restroom paper towel dispenser (seriously), ringing guitars come charging in, bolstered by Pollard’s equally anthemic vocals. Things only grow more sweeping over the course of the next four minutes, so you may want to buckle your seat belts.

Take a listen below.

Space Gunhere is out March 23rd. Pre-order it , and find the artwork and tracklist below.

Space Gun Artwork:

spacegun small Guided By Voices announce new album, Space Gun, share the title track: Stream

Space Gun Tracklist:
01. Space Gun
02. Colonel Paper
03. King Flute
04. Ark Technican
05. See My Field
06. Liar’s Box
07. Blink Bank
08. Daily Get Ups
09. Hudson Rake
10. Sport Component National
11. I Love Kangaroos
12. Grey Spat Matters
13. That’s Good
14. Flight Advantage
15. Evolution Circus

As mentioned above, for this edition of Origins, Gillard walks us through some of the intriguing (and quite unexpected) influences that informed Space Gun.

YouTube Instructional Videos:

Bob’s notes for the intro riff of the song “See My Field” indicated he wanted a sitar-like sound.

No way was I getting or renting one of those jenky modern electric guitar/sitars when its so easy to simulate the sound by modifying a regular electric. I found several approaches on YouTube, but the one that worked for me was attaching a paper clip to the bridge of my Jaguar and laying it over the string so it vibrates. It was subtle but effective.

Tales of Late Night Garbage Can Scrounging:

The second song on the album is “Colonel Paper”, which Bob was inspired to write from a true story. Its about a close friend and ex-bandmate who bought a bucket of KFC when his wife went away for the weekend, ate one or two pieces, then threw away most of it in the master trash can in the cold garage and passed out. He woke up hungry in the middle of the night and remembered he threw away the bucket. So he went back out to the garage, rummaged around in the trash can, reaching past the other garbage, paper and cigarette butts, and proceeded to eat that remaining extra-crispy-coated cold bird muscle and tendon.

Kangaroos:

The fourth song on side two of Space Gun is “I Love Kangaroos”. Apparently it was inspired by a clip Bob saw of a person pushed into water by a kangaroo. The verse lyrics go somewhere else though, mentioning a journey across the sea, penguin books, joining the Navy. A sort of travelogue as Bob mentions in the song.

I also used a raccoon cat toy for the intro for no reason. It makes a chirpy animal sound when touched. My cat ignores it, but at least I put it to use for the album.

Older demos:

Bob dug out a beautiful song he wrote years ago and never recorded called “That’s Good”. He did issue the demo on Suitcase 3, but for Space Gun we turned it into a massive ballad. I did a big string arrangement for this one, and we think it’s sure to put a tear in your beer.

The Go-Betweens — “Cattle And Cane”:

This was an amazing early GB 45 written by Grant McLennan that Bob bought back in the early 80’s. There’s a song on the album where he wanted us to shoot for a sound and feel similar to “Cattle And Cane”, and by god, we achieved it.

Phoenix Airport Restroom Paper Towel Dispensers:

Bob had Kevin capture the sounds of a motion-sensor towel dispenser, which was perfect for one of the songs. What would any of us do now without Voice Memo to record cool things we hear?

Wire — 154:

This may not be worth an entry here, because Wire has been an influential component of every Guided By Voices record. Its akin to my listing The Who and Beatles for this record; its just a given and a reliable constant. But there is a song in particular, “Blink Blank”, where I remember going for a Clone Theory-type chorused sound, and Bob’s demo put me in the mind of the slower dramatic Lewis songs on 154.

Mark plays a great chorused bass on this as well. It has some elements that take it out of 154 territory like white-noise synths I added and some great pounding drums by Kevin. “I’m going blink blank/ In the think tank.” My take on that refrain is that its Bob’s own way of conveying insanity in one’s membrane.

GBV will tour behind Space Gun in April; those dates are below.

Guided by Voices 2018 Tour Dates:
04/13 – Ann Arbor, MI @ Blind Pig
04/14 – Indianapolis, IN @ HI-FI Indy
04/17 – Philadelphia, PA @ Union Transfer
04/18 – Jersey City, NJ @ White Eagle Hall
04/20 – Ithaca, NY @ The Haunt
04/21 – Cleveland, OH @ Grog Shop



Source link

Posted on

Wilco share deluxe reissues of A.M. and Being There: Stream/download


Today, Wilco are revisiting their past with deluxe reissues of their first two albums, 1995’s A.M. and 1996’s Being There. Apple Music and Spotify users can taken a listen to both below.

Due out through Rhino Records, each reissue comes jam-packed with bonus material. A.M., available on CD and double-LP, boasts eight unreleased songs. Those include an early take on “Outtasite (Outta Mind)” and “When You Find Trouble”, the final studio recording from Jeff Tweedy, John Stirratt, and Ken Coomer’s pre-Wilco band, Uncle Tupelo. In liner notes provided exclusively for the reissue, Stirratt wrote, “Listening back to records 15 to 20 years later, I’m always taken with the confident but guileless quality of bands in their 20s, that strange mixture of innocence and conviction, and this is one of those records.”

(Read: Wilco in 10 Songs)

The Being There reissue, meanwhile, is bundled with even more extra goodies, spread across five CDs or four LPs. There are 15 previously unreleased bonus tracks, including alternate takes on “I Got You” and “Say You Miss Me”. For the digital and CD formats, a 20-song live performance recorded at California’s Troubadour circa 1996 will be included. All versions will come with a four-song KCRW set the band recorded later that same year.

A.M. and Being There Artwork:


screen shot 2017 11 30 at 1 02 05 pm Wilco share deluxe reissues of A.M. and Being There: Stream/download

A.M. Deluxe Reissue Tracklist:
01. I Must Be High
02. Casino Queen
03. Box Full Of Letters
04. Shouldn’t Be Ashamed
05. Pick Up The Change
06. I Thought I Held You
07. That’s Not The Issue
08. It’s Just That Simple
09. Should’ve Been In Love
10. Passenger Side
11. Dash 7
12. Blue Eyed Soul
13. Too Far Apart

Bonus Material
14. When You Find Trouble – Uncle Tupelo
15. Those I’ll Provide
16. Lost Love – Golden Smog (Take 1 Vocal 2)
17. Myrna Lee
18. She Don’t Have To See You – Golden Smog
19. Outtasite (Outta Mind) – Early Version (Take 6)
20. Piss It Away
21. Hesitation Rocks

Being There Deluxe Reissue Tracklist:
Disc One: Original Album
01. Misunderstood
02. Far, Far Away
03. Monday
04. Outtasite (Outta Mind)
05. Forget The Flowers
06. Red-Eyed And Blue
07. I Got You (At The End Of The Century)
08. What’s The World Got In Store
09. Hotel Arizona
10. Say You Miss Me

Disc Two: Original Album
01. Sunken Treasure
02. Someday Soon
03. Outta Mind (Outta Sight)
04. Someone Else’s Song
05. Kingpin
06. (Was I) In Your Dreams
07. Why Would You Wanna Live
08. The Lonely 1
09. Dreamer In My Dreams

Disc Three: Outtakes/Alternates/Demos
01. Late Blooming Son
02. I Got You – Dobro Mix Warzone
03. Out Of Sight, Out Of Mind – Alternate
04. Far Far Away (Dark Side Of The Room)
05. Dynamite My Soul
06. Losing Interest
07. Why Would You Wanna Live – Alternate
08. Sun’s A Star
09. Capitol City
10. Better When I’m Gone
11. Dreamer In My Dreams – Alternate Rough Take
12. Say You Miss Me – Alternate
13. I Got You – Alternate
14. Monday – Party Horn Version
15. I Can’t Keep From Talking

Disc Four: Live At The Troubadour 11/12/96 (Part One)
01. Sunken Treasure
02. Red-Eyed And Blue
03. I Got You (At The End Of The Century)
04. Someone Else’s Song
05. Someday Soon
06. Forget The Flowers
07. New Madrid
08. I Must Be High
09. Passenger Side – Punk Version
10. Passenger Side
11. Hotel Arizona
12. Monday
13. Say You Miss Me

Disc Five: Live At The Troubadour 11/12/96 (Part Two)
01. Outtasite (Outta Mind)
02. The Long Cut
03. Kingpin
04. Misunderstood
05. Far, Far Away
06. Give Back The Key To My Heart
07. Gun
Live On KCRW 11/13/96
08. Sunken Treasure
09. Red-Eyed And Blue
10. Far, Far Away
11. Will You Love Me Tomorrow



Source link

Posted on

Top 50 Albums of 2017


Last year felt particularly cruel as we watched so many of our pop-culture icons get taken from us without warning. By December, we all yearned for a pause, an ending, a reset. However, none of the comfort that comes with the hopeful act of flipping a calendar page lasted long into 2017. Instead, we’ve felt the pain more acutely and more personally than a year ago. Most of us have witnessed our core values challenged, felt our realities shaken, and endured daily reminders that who we are in our most basic integrity remains very much at stake. For that reason, it’s been a year in which we’ve turned to music out of necessity perhaps more than ever. The albums you find on this list aren’t just records we admired or caught ourselves dancing to. In many cases, they’re part of the reason we’re still here. They’ve consoled and empowered us, understood how we’ve felt, and in a time of such ugly, bitter divisiveness, reminded us that we’re never truly alone in mind, heart, or spirit.

These are the 50 albums we’ve leaned on most this year. Here’s hoping they don’t have to do such heavy lifting in 2018.

–Matt Melis
Editorial Director

__________________________________________________________

50. Johnny Jewel – Windswept

windswept Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Los Angeles, California

The Gist: After placing Chromatics’ Dear Tommy in the Red Room, Italians Do It Better producer and multi-instrumentalist Johnny Jewel issued this daring solo album mostly inspired by his work behind the scenes on Twin Peaks: The Return.

Why It Rules: With Windswept, Jewel sounds more assured as a producer than ever, conjuring up a moody amalgamation of his signature brooding synthpop and a style of free-form jazz akin to David Lynch go-to Angelo Badalamenti.

Essential Tracks: “Windswept”, “Slow Dreams”, and “Between Worlds”

–Michael Roffman

__________________________________________________________

49. Oneohtrix Point Never – Good Time

good time oneohtrix soundtrack stream listen Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Wayland, Massachusetts

The Gist: Two years after the interstellar, metallic Garden of Delete, esoteric electronic experimentalist Daniel Lopatin (AKA Oneohtrix Point Never) returned to score a crime drama starring Robert Pattinson. Retaining his own burning palette and pushing it through a Vangelis/Carpenter mesh, Lopatin continues to find new ways to inject anxiety and awe under the skin.

Why It Rules: A somber, piano-heavy collaboration with Iggy Pop in which the Stooge dreams about petting crocodiles is a good place to start, but Lopatin delivers the high-voltage thrills all on his own.

Essential Tracks: “Hospital Escape / Access-A-Ride”, “The Acid Hits”, and “The Pure and the Damned”

–Lior Phillips

__________________________________________________________

48. Jay Som – Work Songs

jay som everybody works Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Oakland, CA

The Gist: Multiple-instrumentalist Melina Duterte (aka Jay Som) rode her production and recording acumen on debut LP, Turn Into, to a deal with indie major Polyvinyl for Everybody Works.

Why It Rules: In what can only be described as bedroom maximalism, Duterte dug her lyrics into the granular, banalities of existence and aimed her production at expansive soundscapes. On “The Bus Song”, Duterte sings, “I can be whoever I want to be,” and that’s exactly who she is on Everybody Works.

Essential Tracks: “The Bus Song”, “Everybody Works”, and “For Light”

–Geoff Nelson

__________________________________________________________

47. The JuJu – Exchange

the juju exchange shin maeng billboard embed Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Chicago, Illinois

The Gist: After rising to session-player fame by collaborating with Chance the Rapper, Kanye West, and Vic Mensa, 24-year-old trumpeter Segal (FKA Donnie Trumpet) wrangled three fellow Chicago musicians together to expand his interest in experimental jazz, ultimately showcasing how the backbeat of hip-hop’s new sound is worthy of its own spotlight.

Why It Rules: On their debut LP, The Juju Exchange follow in the footsteps of producers like Flying Lotus and Knxwledge — not in sound, but in audience awareness, drawing listeners out of their usual jazz associations and into a world of smooth, free-form, low-key musings that inspire with their use of ample space.

Essential Tracks: “The Circuit”, “We Good”, and “Morning Of”

–Nina Corcoran

__________________________________________________________

46. Hans Zimmer and Benjamin Wallfish – Blade Runner 2049

blade runner 2049 soundtrack artwork Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Santa Monica, California; London, United Kingdom

The Gist: All signs pointed to chaos when director Denis Villeneuve parted ways with composer Jóhann Jóhannsson at the 25th hour, but Hans Zimmer and Benjamin Wallfish rose up to the challenge with an unexpected Hail Mary score.

Why It Rules: In addition to time restraints, both Zimmer and Wallfish had to follow in the footsteps of Vangelis, whose original Blade Runner score remains inimitable. They succeeded with a follow-up that’s both reverent and wholly intimidating.

Essential Tracks: “Sea Wall”, “Rain”, and “Wallace”

–Michael Roffman

__________________________________________________________

45. Paramore – After Laughter

paramore after laughter download album stream mp3 Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Nashville, Tennessee

The Gist: Another lineup change and personal turmoil almost broke up Paramore, but Hayley Williams, Taylor York, and a returning Zac Farro came back stronger than ever to record their most pop-leaning album to date.

Why It Rules: On After Laughter, Paramore step completely away from their pop-punk origins and embrace the influences of Fleetwood Mac, Talking Heads, and Blondie. Catchy sing-along hooks and ’80s pop production combine for a bright, polished sound that barely conceals the heartbreak and pain in the lyrics underneath. Williams describes the album best with the catchphrase “cry hard, dance harder.”

Essential Tracks: “Rose Colored Boy”, “26”, and “Hard Times”

–Eddie Fu

__________________________________________________________

44. Khalid – American Teen

khalid american teen Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Fort Stewart, Georgia

The Gist: The 19-year-old R&B singer’s debut album builds from the buzzing lead single, “Location”, and demonstrates a strong grasp of the pulse of his generation without alienating a greater audience.

Why It Rules: Khalid’s silky-smooth voice and anthemic hooks combine with pop/R&B production for a fresh sound that doesn’t push the rookie too far outside his comfort zone. American Teen is a solid effort in its own right while also allowing plenty of room for growth as he comes of age.

Essential Tracks: “Young Dumb & Broke”, “Location”, and “8teen”

–Eddie Fu

__________________________________________________________

43. Phoenix – Ti Amo

phoenix ti amo Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Versailles, France

The Gist: Caught between the brutality of the Bataclan massacre and the subsequent ascent of France’s right-wing reactionaries, veteran synth rocker Thomas Mars and co. escaped the tension by looking backward via this Italo-disco ode to bygone Riviera summers.

Why It Rules: Released just in time for the warm-weather months, Ti Amo hit like the aural equivalent of a white wine spritzer: Singles “J-Boy” and “Ti Amo” bubble with a radio-ready fizz, while deeper cuts like “Tuttifrutti” and “Fleur De Lys” add a shade of heady longing to all that sunbaked pop.

Essential Tracks: “J-Boy”, “Tuttifrutti”, and “Fleur De Lys”

–Tyler Clark

__________________________________________________________

42. Migos – Culture

migos culture Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Atlanta, Georgia

The Gist: Riding high off the runaway hip-hop hit “Bad and Boujee”, the prodigious trio of Offset, Quavo, and Takeoff fully capitalized on that momentum with a splendid set of tracks that put even the best work in their mixtape-heavy discography on notice.

Why It Rules: Backed by a cadre of producers, including Metro Boomin and Zaytoven, the success-obsessed bars and hedonistic hooks of Culture perfectly encapsulate the breadth of trap music, from its hypnagogic highs to its unapologetic lows.

Essential Tracks: “Bad and Boujee”, “Slippery”, and “T-Shirt”

–Gary Suarez

__________________________________________________________

41. Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein – Stranger Things 2

stranger things 2 Top 50 Albums of 2017

Origin: Austin, TX

The Gist: Another season of Netflix’s Stranger Things means another vintage score from Survive’s own Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein, and that’s exactly what they dropped back in October ahead of the series’ highly anticipated premiere.

Why It Rules: A year has passed. They’re a little older. They’re a little wiser. No longer are they echoing the iconic sounds of John Carpenter or Goblin, but indulging in more modern fare like Bon Iver and M83. Hawkins has never sounded so hip.

Essential Tracks: “Eulogy”, “Eight Fifteen”, and “On the Bus”

–Michael Roffman

__________________________________________________________



Source link

Posted on

The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time


Artwork by Cap Blackard

The two best-selling soundtracks of all time celebrate milestones this November, with Saturday Night Fever turning 40 and The Bodyguard turning 25. With that in mind, we decided to take a look at what exactly makes a film soundtrack great, something that seemed much easier on paper than in execution.

We found plenty of soundtracks that excelled by using subtle songs in the periphery of pivotal scenes, and we also came across films that dropped the music right into the story, as part of the plot or even as a character itself. We came across those movies that made hits out of otherwise obscure songs, while also taking into account films that hijacked a popular song and made it indistinguishable from the film itself. More importantly, we looked at the soundtracks that enhanced the film and went hand-in-hand with its tone and story, giving you greater insight into pivotal scenes and character growth.

We avoided musicals, band movies, concert films, and scores in this regard, focusing solely on the best use of popular music in film, combing through movies from the ’60s all the way up to 2017 until we had our picks. As with any list of this size, there are bound to be disagreements as well as some soundtracks that should have made the cut. Let us know what you think we missed, but in the meantime, sit back and take a whirlwind trip through music in cinema with our picks for the 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time.

–Doug Nunnally
Contributing Writer

_________________________________________________________

100. Juno (2007)

juno The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Jason Reitman and Diablo Cody’s quirky dramedy about a misfit teenager who finds herself two months pregnant and decides to have and adopt out her baby gets a lot of things right. One of those is a soundtrack that almost acts as an interior monologue for the title character. While Juno MacGuff may dig the raw power of Iggy and his Stooges, having indie vet Kimya Dawson’s soft voice and oddball lyrics floating in during transitions or when Juno’s faced with a difficult moment feels like a far better match. So taken by Dawson’s music was Reitman that he had her re-record instrumentals and humming to use for scenes and commissioned Mateo Messina to use her style as the basis for the scored parts of the movie. The final result is a soundtrack of unforgettable moments like Juno and Paulie dueting “Anyone Else but You” and the latter completing his morning routine to The Kinks’ brilliant “A Well Respected Man”. Wizard. –Matt Melis

_________________________________________________________

99. Batman Forever (1995)

batman forever The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

The less said about Joel Schumacher’s Batman films, the better, but kudos has to be given to the soundtrack for his first attempt. Though only a few of its songs appear in the film, the soundtrack picks up the ball Schumacher so casually dropped with a deep mélange that helped illustrate Batman’s gritty nature, Robin’s empowered gall, Riddler’s manic depravity, and Two-Face’s fractured distress — all things effectively absent within Schumaker’s obtrusive vision. It doesn’t quite hit the lofty mark of Prince’s interpretation, but thanks to Seal’s powerhouse song and U2’s surprising gem, it definitely comes close. –Doug Nunnally

_________________________________________________________

98. The Karate Kid (1984)

the karate kid The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Look, The Karate Kid is basically Little Rocky. You’ve got director John G. Avildsen behind the camera again and his buddy Bill Conti added yet another triumphant score to make everyone believe that an underdog could rise to the top. But, like any story that’s repackaged for a younger audience, it’s gotta be hip, and that’s essentially what this soundtrack is — at least for the time. Even then, nobody was listening to Joe Esposito’s “You’re the Best” without singing along ironically (hell, it was rejected by Rocky Balboa himself), but they were rocking out to Gang of Four (“Desire”) or Broken Edge (“No Shelter”). And while it’s a crime Bananarama’s “Cruel Summer” was left off, you get your New Wave fix with Commuter (“Young Hearts”) and Baxter Robertson (“Feel the Night”), two songs that will legitimately dent your soul. Wax on, wax off, people. –Michael Roffman

_________________________________________________________

97. Space Jam (1996)

space jam The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Here’s something that doesn’t get discussed a lot — the soundtrack to Space Jam contained five Top 40 hits, four of them being Top 10 hits that made 1996 and 1997 a time that you couldn’t escape this soundtrack if you tried. But the real charm for this soundtrack lies outside the hits, like great dance/hip-hop songs by Robin S and Salt-N-Pepa, though all you really need to know about this soundtrack’s quality is that it got Busta Rhymes, Coolio, LL Cool J, and Method Man to all collaborate on a song about the villainous Monstars … and it’s absolutely phenomenal. –Doug Nunnally

_________________________________________________________

96. Angus (1995)

angus The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

If we’re talking about soundtracks being emblematic of the mid-’90s high school experience, few are as tried and true as Angus. At the time, the whole grunge scene had given way to a more alternative sound with Green Day and Weezer leading the charge. Wouldn’t you know, they both headline this collection, what with Green Day’s memorial song “J.A.R. (Jason Andrew Relva)” tipping off the LP and Weezer’s “You Gave Your Love to Me Softly” sitting right in the middle between Ash, Smoking Popes, and The Muffs. Fun fact: That latter song wasn’t intended for the soundtrack, as frontman Rivers Cuomo originally penned a song for the film titled “Wanda (You’re My Only Love)”, which was rejected for being “too much of a strict interpretation of the movie.” It’s okay, like Angus, they won out in the end, releasing Pinkerton the following year. –Michael Roffman

_________________________________________________________

95. Elizabethtown (2005)

elizabethtown The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Cameron Crowe’s much-maligned 2005 treatise on kindness, forgiveness, love, and Manic Pixie Dream Girls might have become a punchline in its own time, but one of its more lasting impressions is its soundtrack, crafted specifically to bring Orlando Bloom’s suicidal ex-shoe designer (yep) back from the brink. Through a mixture of Kirsten Dunst’s love and a sprawling playlist including Tom Petty, Ryan Adams, My Morning Jacket, Lindsey Buckingham, Elton John, U2, and a host of other familiar and minor names alike, Crowe serves as the benevolent god of his film’s loving world. Bloom might be trapped in a fiasco, but the soundtrack looks straight ahead to clearer skies. —Dominick Suzanne-Mayer

_________________________________________________________

94. Times Square (1980)

times square The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

You’ve probably never seen Times Square. Don’t worry. Not many have. Even now, despite its cult acclaim, Allan Moyle’s punk rock coming-of-age movie is an under-the-radar gem. Those who have seen it, probably remember its groundbreaking double-album soundtrack that features a who’s who of punk and new wave titans circa 1980, from Talking Heads to The Cure, Gary Numan to Patti Smith. As Wet Hot American Summer composer Craig Wedren told us years ago, “Times Square totally cracked [the underground] open. It was an introduction to our music, our generation’s music: the early MTV hard rock top 40 and the new wave that was happening between 1979 and 1981.” In other words, a totally essentially time capsule. –Michael Roffman
_________________________________________________________

93. Stealing Beauty (1996)

stealing beauty The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Italian writer-director Bernardo Bertolucci has struck serious highs in terms of epic drama (The Last Emperor) and provocative, controversial sensuality (Last Tango in Paris). The 1996 Liv Tyler-starring Stealing Beauty may not have the cultural cache or critical seal of approval of his most beloved films, but the atmospheric, blue moodiness of the soundtrack alone fills the film with smoky appeal that transcends its ‘90s bonds. The film finds the melancholy in the Cocteau Twins as well as Mozart, Mazzy Star, and Nina Simone. The film is haunted by poetry (Liv Tyler’s Lucy deals with the death of her poet mother), and the soundtrack is similarly obsessed with the beauty of quiet moments and subtle, swaying emotion. But when the mood breaks, as it must inevitably, you’d be hard-pressed to find better explosions than Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition”. –Lior Phillips

_________________________________________________________

92. 500 Days Of Summer (2009)

500 days The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

500 Days Of Summer’s soundtrack works as a cohesive gel, piecing together the disjointed narrative so you can absorb the nonlinear scenes with better clarity and context. Though we know how it ends, The Temper Trap’s “Sweet Disposition” allows us to experience the wide-eyed wonderment of love, while Hall and Oates’ “You Make My Dreams Come True” helps illustrate its fantasies. The best case for music bridging the gap is the expectation vs. reality scene, deftly scored by Regina Spektor’s “Hero”. Your eyes dart between the two unfolding scenes, but it’s the song’s disappointed tone that you can’t avoid, hammering home the scene’s, and the soundtrack’s, true impact. –Doug Nunnally

_________________________________________________________

91. The Lost Boys (1987)

lost boys The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

The worst thing about The Lost Boys soundtrack is that you have to imagine Tim Capello shirtless when you listen to “I Still Believe”. It’s a ludicrous song that works much better on-screen, where we can actually see his hunky, muscle-y abs reflecting the beach flames of Santa Carla, California. Nonetheless, there are plenty other goodies to sink your teeth into on this album, which may be the most bizarre hodgepodge of musicians assembled for what’s ostensibly an alty ’80s film. Like, why is Echo and the Bunnymen covering The Doors’ “People are Strange”? Or why is Roger Daltrey wedged between two songs by INXS? Whatever, it all works, and don’t tell me you’ve never screamed with Gerard McMann on “Cry Little Sister”. –Michael Roffman

_________________________________________________________

90. Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World (2010)

scottpilgrim albumcover The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

If you’re going to write a movie with a battle of the bands at its core, you better be ready to have a great soundtrack and some top-tier songwriters on board to ensure you can actually build some drama into that climactic battle. For Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World, Edgar Wright amassed a super-team to make sure that both the songs chosen and composed for the soundtrack would rock hard enough to literally battle competitors. The songs for Scott’s band, Sex Bob-Omb, were written by Beck, while Broken Social Scene write and perform as Crash and the Boys. But let’s not forget to credit the actors: Michael Cera, Mark Webber, Alison Pill, Johnny Simmons, and Erik Knudsen all actually played instruments and sang for the soundtrack, while Sloan’s Chris Murphy coached guitar. Add to that mix a swathe of stomping classic rock (T. Rex, The Rolling Stones) and a score featuring Radiohead contributor Nigel Godrich, Beck, Dan the Automator, Cornelius, and more, and Scott Pilgrim has the brash pedigree to pull off its musical conceit. –Lior Phillips

_________________________________________________________

89. Ghostbusters II (1989)

screen shot 2017 11 13 at 10 48 58 am The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Hot take: Bobby Brown’s greatest song is “On Our Own”. That’s not irony. That’s not hyperbole. That’s a cold, hard fact. The de facto theme song of Ghostbusters II thrives from a shivering glaze of New Jack swing, the likes of which wouldn’t sound this polished and this lush until Michael Jackson would go all-in on the genre a couple years later on 1991’s Dangerous. It’s a total improvement over Ray Parker Jr.’s original theme, which also gets a facelift on this soundtrack with a remix by the one and only Run-DMC. (Not surprisingly, their version is better.) Elsewhere, you get slimed by a little hip-hop (Doug E. Fresh), some veteran rock (Elton John, Glenn Frey), and a whole lotta soul (Howard Huntsberry), all of which screams 1989. –Michael Roffman

_________________________________________________________

88. American Pie (1999)

american pie The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

What you have to keep telling yourself whenever you watch American Pie is that, yes, this is a film from another time. Otherwise, you’re going to have an aneurysm from all the rampant homophobia and the fact that its most iconic scene is straight-up sexual predation. Still, even though the film hardly holds up, the soundtrack does, oozing with all kinds of late ’90s alt-rock that will probably be great source of nostalgia in a couple of years if it isn’t already. Those who were also in high school during that era will probably stare off in the distance to Bic Runga’s “Sway” just as they’ll bop their heads to Blink-182’s Enema of the State gem “Mutt”. What sucks most about this soundtrack, however, are all the songs that were left off, from Duke Daniels’ “Following a Star” to Harvey Danger’s “Flagpole Sitta”, to the film’s ostensible theme, James’ “Laid”. Oh well. –Michael Roffman

_________________________________________________________

87. Love and Basketball (2000)


love and basketball The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

All good love stories develop their own soundtrack, and the sweet, smoky, long-gestating romance between Sanaa Lathan’s Monica and Omar Epps’ Quincy in Love & Basketball is no exception. The characters develop an attraction over decades, and all while training and competing. By reaching back to Zapp and Chaka Khan and going all the way through to contemporary R&B jams like Bilal’s “Soul Sista”, the soundtrack reflects changes in intensity and era without losing the thread of frustrated romance. And when they finally find that their chemistry works off the court and get down to business, Maxwell’s “This Woman’s Work” provides the sweet and sultry background. –Adam Kivel

_________________________________________________________

86. The Breakfast Club (1985)


breakfast club The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Few, if any, modern filmmakers take the mundanity of adolescence as seriously as writer-filmmaker John Hughes once did. How committed was Hughes? In The Breakfast Club, he sells us on the idea that a Saturday detention can change how a group of young people view the world. We see these five different students – most of whom would never speak to each other if not locked up in a library together – running through the halls to Wang Chung and dancing together to a Karla DeVito record. It’s all silly and unbelievable, and yet by film’s end the five have managed to learn something life-altering about themselves. When Judd Nelson crosses the football field and iconically pumps his fist to Simple Minds’ “Don’t You (Forget About Me)”, he’s not just celebrating another detention done and over with or even his new girlfriend; it’s a gesture that reminds even the most skeptical among us that real life takes place sometimes where and when we least expect. It’s something John Hughes knew all too well. –Matt Melis

_________________________________________________________

85. American Beauty (2000)

american beauty The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Very few midlife crises sound this exceptional. For Lester Burnham, the sardonic protagonist of Sam Mendes’ American Beauty, this suburban daddy’s jarring left turn from normalcy is at all times beautiful, compelling, and riveting. There’s Bill Withers bringing the soul on “Use Me”, Elliott Smith matching the tranquility of composer Thomas Newman with “Because”, and the FM jams of The Who (“The Seeker”) and Free (“All Right Now”). The generational gaps between all the acts — umm, it oscillates from Bobby Darin and Peggy Lee to Gomez and the Eeels — seems almost implicit, seeing how this is a movie about an old man trying to have sex with a young woman — scratch that, a young teenager. No wonder Kevin Spacey won the Oscar! –Michael Roffman
_________________________________________________________

84. The Darjeeling Limited (2007)

darjeeling The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Three Kinks songs slip in between Bollywood tracks in Wes Anderson’s fifth film to showcase three American brothers’ train-riding vision quest through the Indian countryside. Owen Wilson, Jason Schwartzman, and Adrien Brody are mourning the loss of their father and trapped in cycles of familial struggle, but find a new peace together. The trio move from wondering about where they’ll be “This Time Tomorrow”, to discovering that though they’re “Strangers” they are one on this new road, to coming to grips with the fight against the “Powerman” figure always enforcing the status quo that had kept them apart. And as the film goes on, the Indian music becomes less strange and more essential to their relationship. –Adam Kivel

_________________________________________________________

83. Shaun Of The Dead (2004)

shaun of the dead The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

While Baby Driver solidified Edgar Wright’s unmatched ability to make music an essential character and piece of the narrative, fans of his earlier films — and shout-out to Spaced too — will eagerly explain that that’s always been the case. The first film of the Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy, Shaun of the Dead utilizes both diegetic music and clever scoring to comedic and dramatic affect. Pete Woodhead and Daniel Mudford created the score in honor of classic zombie and horror soundtracks, from John Carpenter vibes to Goblin intensity. Meanwhile, the high-wire choreography of Baby Driver is predated by (among other scenes in Wright’s filmography) a brilliant scene in which Shaun, Ed, Liz, and co. fight off zombies in the Winchester who had been drawn in by a malfunctioning jukebox that wouldn’t stop playing Queen’s “Don’t Stop Me Now”. –Adam Kivel

_________________________________________________________

82. Midnight Cowboy (1969)

everybodys talkin The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Like the movie itself, the soundtrack to Midnight Cowboy is an ambitious affair with a collection of songs that joins together country folk instrumentals and an array of rock styles, from the radio friendly rock sound (including a cover of a great early Warren Zevon song) to more expansive psych explorations, all of which helps explore the complicated psyche of its story. The blend also helps the score pieces resonate, and sets the stage for the iconic “Everybody’s Talkin’”, leading to the first Grammys for both Harry Nilsson and legendary composer John Barry. –Doug Nunnally

_________________________________________________________

81. Top Gun (1986)

top gun The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

As far as ’80s movie soundtracks go, Top Gun may not be the best of the decade, but it’s absolutely among the most memorable. As the above album art suggests, it’s at the very least “up there with the best of the best.” Tony Scott’s film is draped in loud, near-constant pop music, but it’s the two classics from the film’s soundtrack that have come to define the film even more than all of the well-shot, frequently homoerotic action on hand ever could have. Kenny Loggins offered a new path for America, on the highway to the Danger Zone, where Tom Cruise’s ace pilot lives and exists in all of his pursuits. And not only did Berlin’s “Take My Breath Away” underscore each of the film’s many illustrations of the totally hetero passion involving Cruise and Kelly McGillis’ program instructor, but it became one of the biggest power ballads of the decade that defined the form. You, reading this now? There’s like a 40% chance you were made to the tune of “Take My Breath Away”. Congratulations. —Dominick Suzanne-Mayer
_________________________________________________________

80. Mo’ Better Blues (1990)

 The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

As a film, Mo’ Better Blues may not be one of Spike Lee’s more outstanding works, but it indisputably features one of his best soundtracks. The Branford Marsalis Quartet’s work here plays a crucial (you could even say instrumental) role in Lee’s film, chronicling the rise and fall of Denzel Washington’s Bleek with lively, improvisational-feeling jazz riffs of every kind. Plus, how often do you get to hear Washington, Gang Starr, and Wesley Snipes perform over jazz music? It accomplishes what most soundtracks only aspire to do: it truly adds something more to the film beyond it. –Dominick Suzanne-Mayer

_________________________________________________________

79. Marie Antoinette (2006)

marie antoinette The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Sofia Coppola’s misunderstood, anachronistic 2006 take on the last queen of pre-Revolution France speaks the language of decadence as only a Coppola film could. Yet its soundtrack, which initially grated on some listeners, is one of the greats of the aughts, an exercise in melancholic pop sounds that manages to comment on one hedonistic era using the sounds of another. New Order, Bow Wow Wow, The Radio Dept., and a host of other artists add to the lushly ornate settings, glorifying in an era of excess even as it verges on its sudden, violent, and inevitable end. It’s a pop soundtrack for the end of the world as many knew it. –Dominick Suzanne-Mayer

_________________________________________________________

78. Where The Wild Things Are (2009)

where the wild things are The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Eight years later, we’re still periodically baffled that Warner Bros. gave Spike Jonze $100 million of studio money to make what may well be one of the saddest films ever aimed at children. Yet Where the Wild Things Are is worth every cent, a sincerely magical bit of painful fantasy, and one of the better illustrations of childhood fear and anxiety ever put to movie screens. The soundtrack, by Karen O and the Kids, heightens the magical realism of Jonze’s feature, dealing in simple and resonant melodies that transcend the singsong by O’s vocals, which lend the same agonized lilt to the film’s sparse, simple balladry that she often did to even some of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ most biting work. It’s a perfect marriage of artist and art, a soundscape that supplements and adds onto the already wonderful film to which it’s connected. —Dominick Suzanne-Mayer

_________________________________________________________

77. Boomerang (1990)

boomerang The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

A perfect snapshot into early ’90s R&B, Boomerang’s soundtrack captured the changing of the musical guard, proudly showing the wonders of New Jack swing while previewing the expansive hip hop soul that was to come. Both the film and soundtrack had lasting effect on the industry, essentially launching the careers of Halle Berry and Toni Braxton, while also giving ample exposure to a laundry list of artists who would go on to fill the screen and airwaves of the ‘90s: Martin Lawrence, Boyz II Men, Tisha Campbell, TLC, Chris Rock, A Tribe Called Quest. –Doug Nunnally

_________________________________________________________

76. Pretty In Pink (1986)

pretty in pink The 100 Greatest Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Pretty in Pink may not always be at the top of anybody’s John Hughes power ranking, but it’s always a consistent top five, a wild tale of young love that stands as one of his outright funnier movies. But perhaps most memorable, at least to some, is the film’s new wave soundtrack, one that made OMD’s “If You Leave” a chart-topping hit and introduced quite a few young Americans to New Order and Echo and the Bunnymen. That’s all to say nothing of the titular Psychedelic Furs track, the kind of song that captures the ’80s in all its poppy excess in the span of just a few short minutes. Also, Duckie had a lot more to offer than Blaine in the long term. No, we haven’t let this go yet. –Dominick Suzanne-Mayer
_________________________________________________________



Source link